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Roselli’s new homes are buried under North Western Australia’s red-hue soil. Crafted from iron-rich, red sandy clay gathered from a nearby river, they feature a thick 18-inch zigzag facade. The earth’s thermal mass helps to keep the interiors naturally cool, while saving both energy and money.

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Each of the homes comes with its own terrace that makes the most out of Australia’s sunny weather, but they all share the same huge planted roof. According to the architect, these homes move ‘away from the sun-baked, thin corrugated metal shelters to naturally cooled architectural earth formations.’ And their 750-foot rammed earth facade has become the country’s longest such wall.

+ Luigi Roselli

Via Contemporist

Photos by © Edward Birch