Gallery: 6 Hard-to-Kill Plants for the Recovering Brown Thumb

Pothos Pothos is a hardy plant that can survive in lower light and colder temperatures, making it great for city living. There are many types of pothos but the Golden Pothos is one of the most popular varieties and you can recognize it by its golden heart-shaped
 

Pothos

Pothos is a hardy plant that can survive in lower light and colder temperatures, making it great for city living. There are many types of pothos but the Golden Pothos is one of the most popular varieties and you can recognize it by its golden heart-shaped leaves.

ZZ Plant (Zamioculcas zamiifolia)

Sorry for using morbidity to illustrate our point, but the ZZ plant is so hardy, it will most likely outlive you. This cockroach of the plant world thrives in almost all conditions and few pests or diseases could bring it down. The ZZ is especially perfect for urbanites who live in low-light apartments since it likes the shade.

Sansevieria

You’ve probably seen Sansevieria plants around a lot since they’re a favorite because they’re so easy to care for. While its nicknames are not so nice (it’s often called snake plant or mother-in-law’s tongue), this plant couldn’t be more of a pleasure to grow, especially if you’re lazy. They don’t need much light and can thrive in a wide range of temperatures. They like warmth and dry air; will accept a little sun or a lot; and are not even fussy about the amount of moisture in the soil. Called many nicknames by gardeners, including snake plant and mother-in-law’s tongue, Sansevierias are favored for its ability to grow in low-light situations. The durable snake plant will tolerate benign neglect in a wide range of temperatures.

Ponytail Palm

Despite its rather fussy appearance, the Ponytail Palm is one of the most low-maintenance plants you could buy. Since it’s used to being grown in arid conditions, this palm can survive long dry spells so you don’t have to worry much if you forget to water it before you head off for a holiday. The only thing to keep in mind that the Ponytail Palm is pretty slow-growing so don’t expect it to shoot up rapidly in size like some other plants might.

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