Beth Buczynski

6 Human-Powered Gadgets To Improve Your Life

by , 07/19/13


human-powered, pedal-powered, kinetic energy, body heat, soccer ball, play, nPower PEG, chargers, washing machine, LED lights, sleeping bags, water purification, drinking water, flashlight,

Pedal-Powered GiraDora Washer

Electric washers and dryers seem pretty darn convenient until the power goes out. Then, unless you’ve got a washtub, scrub board, and a lot of elbow grease, you’re going to be re-wearing socks until it comes back on. In countries that don’t enjoy washing machines (or the electricity to run them), the GiraDora pedal-powered washing machine/spin dryer is a dream come true. The portable plastic tub can be filled with soap and water before a lid is placed on top, acting as a seat.  Then, all the user needs to do is rest on the washer, and pump the spring-loaded foot pedal. Besides eliminating the back-breaking part of this chore, it also helps conserve water.

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Soccket Energy-Generating Soccer Ball

Even though the pedal-powered washing machine makes a chore a lot easier, it’s still a chore. The Soccket ball actually allows you to reap the energy-generating benefits of having fun. Endowed with a small internal pendulum, the water-proof plaything the ball harnesses energy of the movement by turning a generator connected to a rechargeable battery. The energy captured in only 30 minutes of playing soccer can be used to power a small LED lamp for three hours.

human-powered, pedal-powered, kinetic energy, body heat, soccer ball, play, nPower PEG, chargers, washing machine, LED lights, sleeping bags, water purification, drinking water, flashlight,

Body Heat-Powered Flashlight

Ever really needed a flashlight to investigate a scary noise in the basement, or light the way to the bathroom when the power was out, only to find yours full of dead batteries? Ann Makosinski, a 15-year-old Canadian girl, recently developed a working thermoelectric flashlight that needs nothing but the heat of your hand to illuminate several bright LEDs. “My design is ergonomic, thermodynamically efficient, and only needs a five degree temperature difference to work and produce up to 5.4 mW at 5 foot candles of brightness,” explains Makosinski.

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2 Comments

  1. Cierra Wilson October 20, 2013 at 2:13 pm

    Don’t mind spending money on these things..

  2. Murthy Psr July 19, 2013 at 6:23 pm

    Impressive Products Collection !!!

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