Kevin Lee

7 Animals Recently Driven to Extinction by Humans

by , 11/09/13
filed under: Animals

Baiji River Dolphin, Caribbean Monk Seal, Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Javan Tiger, Lonesome George, Pinta Island Tortoise, Pyrenean Ibex, Western Black Rhinoceros, extinct animals, endangered animals, animals gone thanks to humans, animals driven to extinction by humans, conservation, poaching, deforestation, overfishing, human expansion, hunting, Charles Darwin Research Station, global warming, industrialization, farm expansion, pollution,

Pinta Island Tortoise (2012)

Lonesome George was the last known Pinta Island Tortoise in the world, and he died on June 24, 2012. Although the exact age of the massive reptile was unknown, he was estimated to be over 100 years old. The subspecies of the Galápagos tortoise was first discovered in 1877. Despite being such a majestically ancient animal, the tortoises were nearly hunted to extinction by the end of the 19-century. The species was assumed to be extinct until a single male was discovered in 1971. This lone tortoise was named George and flown to Charles Darwin Research Station on Santa Cruz Island where he lived out the rest of his natural life.

Baiji River Dolphin, Caribbean Monk Seal, Ivory-billed Woodpecker, Javan Tiger, Lonesome George, Pinta Island Tortoise, Pyrenean Ibex, Western Black Rhinoceros, extinct animals, endangered animals, animals gone thanks to humans, animals driven to extinction by humans, conservation, poaching, deforestation, overfishing, human expansion, hunting, Charles Darwin Research Station, global warming, industrialization, farm expansion, pollution,

Western Black Rhinoceros (2011)

Unfortunately we have to inform you that yet another species of rhino is extinct from, you guessed it, poaching. The Western Black Rhinoceros was a subspecies of the black rhino that lived mainly in Cameroon. The rhinos were hunted into extinction for their ivory horns and thick hides—even after protections were issued in the 1930s. Scientists led a survey in 2006 in search of any remaining Western Black Rhinos in their northern Cameroon habitat. Returning without having spotted any, the species was declared extinct in 2011.

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1 Comment

  1. Steve Bock November 16, 2013 at 12:37 am

    I have most definitely seen these woodpeckers in my area near Tulsa, OK.

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