Patrick Toomey-Neri

A Second Peek at Milan Design Week's Brera District

by , 04/18/14


 

Alessandro Zambelli‘s “Afillia” light series is named after a botanical term referring to that which is leafless, but not lifeless. The lacy lights are handcrafted from Swiss pine and nylon fiber, and create a diffused glow similar to that of indirect sunlight.

Inspired by Turkish cooking techniques, Casper Tolhuisen designed this barbecue pot for Soonsalon. Items are placed in the pot to cook, and then dough or citrus fruits seal up the opening, thus creating a steam chamber for the food within.

Clara Rigamonti’sResurrection” series utilizes all manner of found and upcycled components to create new items. This table was formed with machine parts and then topped with a circle of glass.

Another Clara Rigamonti design, “Bar” seems to have been created from an old steel drum.

Her flair for quirky furniture shines through with the “Suitcase Chair”: a bit self-explanatory, but fabulous nonetheless.

For the “Bike Lamp”, Clara used lengths of used bicycle chain to crate an elegant, draped chandelier. Just add some LED lightbulbs and voila!

Every stoneware pot created by Flò Fiori is made by hand and coated with a lead-free glaze. The intent is to create planters that are as beautiful as the flowers and plants that will be grown or displayed within them.

Brazilian designer Jader Almeida created “Roots”: a bench and coffee table made of teak and cork. The piece was designed for Sollos.

Biophilia, a lacy, web-like lamp that looks like it could almost be a living, breathing organism, was created by Lanzavecchia+Wai.

Milan, Milan Design Week, Milan 2014, sustainable design, eco-design, eco furniture, Salone, Brera

Elisa Cavani (aka Manoteca) has transformed an antique door into an exquisite, multi-purpose table. When closed, it provides table space for up to eight people. When opened, it has a series of shelves, cubbyholes, and drawers that can hold everything from letters to art supplies.

Finnish designer Wilhelmiina Kosonen drew from traditional Scandinavian rug-tufting techniques to create Gran Ru; a series of wall-mounted acoustic panels.

+ Milan Design Week

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