Leon Kaye

Aaron Cheng’s Parking + Housing Building Is a Parking Garage That Converts to Housing at Night

by , 07/23/12

Erin Chan, James Dyson award, housing + parking, space utilization, pneumatic structure, ETFE skin, urban planners, parking garages, parking and housing

Designer Aaron Cheng has come up with an innovative design that solves the twin problems of parking and housing in congested urban areas. Designed for single young professionals, Parking + Housing combines parking and living spaces to maximize space efficiency. During the day, the small prefabricated housing units are compressed to create parking spaces, and then in the evening, the pneumatic shelters expands to turn back into living quarters. Under consideration for a James Dyson Award, Cheng’s thoughtful idea opens up a whole new set of pesky questions for urban planners as well as the commuters who would possibly live there.

Erin Chan, James Dyson award, housing + parking, space utilization, pneumatic structure, ETFE skin, urban planners, parking garages, parking and housing

Across the world, from New York to Mumbai, there is less available space as the urban population skyrockets. In Cheng’s view, one of the main problems within these huge global cities is the poor utilization of space. These challenges have been around for decades: parking garages are full during the day and are empty at night. Meanwhile, apartments are vacant during the day, and therefore raise the same usage efficiency problem.

The pneumatic shelter is the focus points for Housing + Parking. The design involves inflating an ETFE skin with air, which assumedly would be from a compressor included within the building—although according to Chang’s plan, a hand pump would do. Such a system would allow the building to seamlessly transform from living space to parking space and vice versa.

While certainly innovative, Chang’s design raises a bevy of questions. Who would want to live in this type of structure? How would residents and parking customers account for varying schedules? Perhaps this would be more suited in a community where young professionals have very similar work patterns. And would people be willing to live in such a place where you are living and breathing very close to where cars are situated? Nevertheless, as cities become more and more crowded because of the educational, economic and cultural opportunities on offer, more ideas like that of Aaron Cheng’s certainly push the conversation as we rethink the urban space.

Via Fast Company, Smart Planet

Photos courtesy James Dyson Award


Designer Aaron Cheng recently submitted his idea for an innovative approach towards solving the twin problems of parking and housing in congested urban areas. Designed for single young professionals, Parking + Housing is Cheng’s idea of a structure that combines parking and living spaces and answers the questions of having empty apartments during the day and vacant parking lot that night. According to Cheng, Parking + Housing maximizes space efficiency. Under consideration for a James Dyson Award, Cheng’s thoughtful idea opens up a whole new set of pesky questions for urban planners as well as the commuters who would possibly live there.

Erin Chan, James Dyson award, housing + parking, space utilization, pneumatic structure, ETFE skin, urban planners, parking garages, parking and housing

Across the world, from New York to Mumbai, there is less available space as the urban population skyrockets. In Cheng’s view, one of the main problems within these huge global cities is the poor utilization of space. These challenges have been around for decades: parking garages are full during the day and are empty at night. Meanwhile, apartments are vacant during the day, and therefore raise the same usage efficiency problem.

Cheng’s goal is to solve this ongoing space utilization problem by creating a new building type in which both housing and parking are integrated within one structure. During the day, the small prefabricated housing units are compressed to create parking spaces, and then in the evening, the process reverses with parking then turning to you of a back into living quarters via a flexible pneumatic shelter.

The pneumatic shelter is the focus points for Housing + Parking. The design involves inflating an ETFE skin with air, which assumedly would be from a compressor included within the building—although according to Chang’s plan, a hand pump would do. Such a system would allow the building to seamlessly transform from living space to parking space and vice versa.

While certainly innovative, Chang’s design raises a bevy of questions. Who would want to live in this type of structure? How would residents and parking customers account for varying schedules? Perhaps this would be more suited in a community where young professionals have very similar work patterns. And would people be willing to live in such a place where you are living and breathing very close to where cars are situated? Nevertheless, as cities become more and more crowded because of the educational, economic and cultural opportunities on offer, more ideas like that of Aaron Cheng’s certainly push the conversation as we rethink the urban space.

Via Fast Company, Smart Planet

Photos courtesy James Dyson Award

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


1 Comment

  1. Shannon Slanina April 3, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    Hmm,maybe more of a hotel also what days off. Just a few less spaces or would it be a big deal an holidays would b a issuse on that also some space would need to b fixed for a workable plan.More of a 50/50.thing.

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home