Maggie Program, Maggie Shelter, DMOA, Maggie Shelter by DMOA, refugees, refugee shelters, temporary housing, refugee housing, modular architecture

Most countries only allow temporary settlements, which means millions of refugees live in tents and lack access to adequate schools and medical wards. Poor living conditions can lead to long-term detrimental effects on health, most of which are preventable through basic protection against the elements. In response, DMOA designed the Maggie Shelter, a well-insulated structure that looks like a tent but offers the benefits of a fixed building.

Related: Accordion-like SURI shelters provide rapid emergency housing for refugees

Maggie Program, Maggie Shelter, DMOA, Maggie Shelter by DMOA, refugees, refugee shelters, temporary housing, refugee housing, modular architecture

Insulation is key to the Maggie Shelter. The building comprises a simple canvas shell with a hollow roof and inner walls that can be filled with locally available materials—such as sand, straw, or even trash—for insulation, stability, and noise reduction. The basic module measures 20 meters by 6 meters and houses up to 60 people; refugees can upgrade and expand the buildings as needed and adapt them for different uses, such as schools and medical wards.

Maggie Program, Maggie Shelter, DMOA, Maggie Shelter by DMOA, refugees, refugee shelters, temporary housing, refugee housing, modular architecture

Likened to an IKEA kit, the Maggie Shelter can be easily built by a team of five or six people. DMOA is currently seeking $41,000 in funds on Indiegogo to bring the shelter to production. You can help donate to the cause here.

+ DMOA

+ Maggie Program

+ Maggie Shelter Indiegogo Campaign

Via ArchDaily

Images via Maggie Program