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Airplane partitions are typically very heavy – and they need to be equipped with a cutout for emergency stretchers and a fold-down chair for cabin attendants. This creates a tricky puzzle for engineers looking to lighten the load. The new 3D-printed partition features a functional, yet artistic criss-cross design that turns out to be even stronger than its predecessor. Best of all, when you take into account the existing number of A320 planes, Airbus estimates that the new partition could save up to 465,000 metric tons of CO2 emissions per year.

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Related: New self-healing material could repair airplanes in mid-flight

The Bionic Partition is currently undergoing 16G crash testing before it is certified and introduced to the current fleet of A320 planes. This is not the first innovation by Benjamin and The Living, as seen in his interview with Inhabitat. In 2014 the designer grew a building from mushroom matter by creating self-assembling plant-based bricks, and before that he grew materials from bacteria. It is clear we have not yet seen the last of the creative minds at The Living.

+ The Living

+ Airbus

+ Autodesk

+ APWorks

Images via The Living