While it will take some time until fully autonomous cars become widely available, some of the technology will find its way into most cars within the next few years. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have announced that 20 automakers will make automatic emergency braking standard on most of their models by the fall of 2022. This equates to “more than 99 percent” of all models that will be for sale in the U.S.


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Related: Volvo crashes into people because owner forgot to buy feature that brakes for humans

Automatic braking systems use on-vehicle sensors such as radar or cameras to detect a possible crash and apply the brakes if the driver does not take action fast enough. The systems are already available on several models, but by making the technology standard on a wider scale, the technology will reduce the risk of vehicles colliding with other cars, pedestrians or objects on the road. The IIHS estimates that rear-end crashes could be reduced by 40 percent thanks to the technology.

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“It’s an exciting time for vehicle safety. By making emergency braking systems standard equipment on their vehicles, these 20 automakers will help prevent crashes and save lives,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “It’s a win for safety and a win for consumers.”

Via The Verge

All images @ Hyundai, Volvo and Ford