This striking angular residence in Seoul channels the client’s creative personality and the history of the plot, previously occupied by a fortuneteller and shaman. Architecture firm Moon Hoon designed the house, named Dogok Maximum, for a photographer and her mother as an original urban residence with a basement photography studio, built to maximize privacy from the busy area.


Moon Hoon, Dogok Maximum, Seoul, Gangnam, green architecture, natural light, woodwork, checkered tiling, sculptural building, pattern

The five-story building has a relief-patterned facade with small openings that allow natural light into the interior, but protects the occupants’ privacy. Located in Seoul’s Gangnam neighborhood, the house reflects the enigmatic history of the plot and the client’s personality. Diagonal pattern of raised and recessed sections runs across the facade and is reflected in the interior of the house. Wooden patchwork, checkered tiles and parquet flooring is in line with the daring, sculptural form of the building.

Moon Hoon, Dogok Maximum, Seoul, Gangnam, green architecture, natural light, woodwork, checkered tiling, sculptural building, pattern

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The windows are small to provide privacy in the high-density area. “I feel uncomfortable whenever I see contemporary buildings with large openings,” said Moon Hoon. “Such an entrance could be even worse if it is for a residence because personally I think it is often feared that it would only allow too much light inside and violate my privacy.”

+ Moon Hoon

Via Dezeen

Photos by Namgoong Sun