Tiny budgets can be hard to work with, but they often help us become more creative by necessity. That’s what happened for Indian architecture firm Design Work Group (DWG), which was asked to convert an old building into software company Peacock Technology’s new workspace. To minimize costs without compromising aesthetics, the architects creatively recycled discarded materials—from car tires to old floppy disks—into furniture and decoration.



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Located in the Special Economic Zone of Icchapor in Gujarat’s Surat city, Peacock Technology’s new office is proof that resourceful upcycling can create a welcoming environment for both work and play. DWG rose to the challenge of sticking to a tight budget by using reclaimed materials that proved to be easy to find since the port city of Surat had many demolished wooden houses, the parts of which were sold in nearby scrap yards. “We found this as the best way to incorporate the architecture of the city in to our interior,” write the architects.

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Related: Willem Heeffer’s Mandala Office Retrofit Pops With Bold Colors and Recycled Materials

The scrap yards provided a bounty of materials, including paper tubes, reclaimed wood, tires, glass bottles, plumbing pipes, and more, that the architects combined with Peacock Technology’s waste that included materials like keyboards, floppy disks, and old CDs. The architects teamed up with art students to transform the materials into furnishings, such as seating made from tires, a CD tabletop, and a receptionist desk made from reclaimed bannister pieces and leftover wood.

+ Design Work Group

Via ArchDaily

Images © Bhavesh Raghavani