In what certainly could never be called a subtle upgrade, Australian firm Hook Turn Architecture has tacked on a massive tessellated bluestone box to the backend of an old Victoria home in Brunswick East, a suburb just outside of Melbourne. Although the renovation process for the Quarry House called for retaining the original 1880s Victorian brick facade in the front, the architects decided to get playful with the back yard addition, plopping a locally-sourced bluestone cube with a gaping window on top of the original structure.



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The second story box is virtually undetected from the front of the house, but once around back, the new addition is quite the eye-catching feature. However, the large blue box does have a local significance. The architects chose to go bold with the bluestone in order to pay respectful homage to the surrounding area’s history of brick and bluestone quarrying.

Related: Renovated Victorian House in Toronto combines the best of rural and urban living

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Using that as a starting point, the architects envisioned a design of two stacked boxes, one brick box on the ground floor that blended in nicely with the original brick structure, and one massive bluestone box on the upper floor. The top box extends out over the ground floor in order to provide the interior with shade during the hot summer months.

As for the exterior of the stone box, a tessellated pattern was used to give the new addition some depth and character. The large window was carved out using folded zinc panels on the border to give off the appearance of eroded columnar basalt, leaving the window looking like gaping hole from the outside, but letting in optimal daylight into the new master bedroom. As for the rest of the home, the interior is daylit from a central courtyard built into the design.

+ Hook Turn Architecture

Via Design Milk