Good design really does make all the difference when it comes to energy conservation. This residential building in Lustenau, Austria, has no active, energy-intensive heating, ventilation, or cooling systems. Instead, baumschlager eberle architects opted for passive design features that allow users to regulate indoor temperatures and ventilation themselves.


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The building relies on natural principles to provide optimal environmental conditions within its well-insulated stone envelope. The inner layer of this shell ensures high compressive strength, while the other layer guarantees efficient thermal insulation. Recessed windows reduce heat gains, while sensor-controlled vents fastened on the inside provide fresh air.

Related: Japanese box house uses passive design to slash energy bills

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In cold winter weather, waste heat ensures a high energy input and the window vents only open if the volume of carbon dioxide in the room increases. During summer nights, the vents open to induce a draft for natural cooling.

+ baumschlager eberle

Via Architizer

Photos by Arch Photo, Inc.