recycled jean insulation, corrugated metal, recycled pallet wood, tiny house, tiny home, salvaged materials, micro home, West Oakland, Mark Alford, Eliana Chinea,

Mark and Eliana used to live in an expensive studio in West Oakland but craved a more minimal and affordable alternative. Mark, who works as the lead Visual Merchandiser for San Francisco’s Rapha Cycle Club, told Shelby Tramel of Olivers: “We were just fed up with the whole stereotype of needing everything. I mean, there’s an entire industry devoted to keeping shit that you don’t even use anymore with storage places that you basically pay additional rent on to house things you don’t ever see again and eventually forget.” On October 2014, the couple announced their plans to build a tiny house in an endeavor nicknamed “Project Freedom.”

recycled jean insulation, corrugated metal, recycled pallet wood, tiny house, tiny home, salvaged materials, micro home, West Oakland, Mark Alford, Eliana Chinea,

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After six months of building and $7,000 spent, the couple has nearly finished their new 200-square-foot house. Topped by a slightly canted corrugated metal roof, the micro-home is clad in reclaimed pallet wood and sheet metal and insulated with recycled jeans. A skylight and large windows—purchased for just $250 and salvaged from a barn—let in the breeze and natural light. Like most tiny homes, the dwelling is set on wheels. The interior, still a work in progress, thus far includes a lofted bedroom, bathroom, and office area with a desk.

+ Mark and Eliana’s Tiny House

Via Oliver

Images via Oliver, © Zachary Domes