Last year Italian company World’s Advanced Saving Project (WASP) debuted BigDelta, a 40-foot-tall 3D-printer that prints affordable, sustainable homes. Now they’re organizing workshops and inviting local makers to participate as they work towards printing their first Earth home in an Italian “technological village” called Shamballa. Constructed from a locally-sourced mix of dirt and straw, these ecological homes are notably “light and strong.”

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Shamballa is located at Massa Lombarda, a commune in the Italian province of Ravenna. There, WASP is testing their 3D-printer at an open-air site. They’ve invited local makers to participate in the project, which they describe as the first house 3D-printed completely from the unique earthy mix of “terrain and straw.” The mix is kneaded with a “mixing machine and motor hoe.”

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They’ve taken design into account: WASP has used the earth to 3D-print fanciful patterns. So far they have a wall about 20 inches high, and after a promising test last weekend, WASP plans to continue 3D-printing with BigDelta until their first home is complete.

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WASP will be bringing their other 3D-printers to the site and will host workshops on the variety of objects that can be made with their printers, such as kilns, ceramic plates, and vertical gardens. They aim to make Shamballa a “Technology Experimentation Centre” that revolves around 3D-printing and self-sufficiency.

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According to WASP, “The keyword of the technological village is ‘DIY.’ We want to build a new economy vision based on a self-sufficient society able to produce basic requirements in many fields: housing, food, employment, healthcare, education, and art.”

They aim to make Shamballa not only a 3D-printing hub, but a village where technology and sustainability reside together. Along with using eco-friendly building materials, WASP’s 3D-printed structures will function with “low energy consumption.”

+ WASP

Images courtesy of WASP