Pickett Furniture Makes Reclaimed Wood Fun with a Gaming Table, Giant Clock and Other Playful Accoutrements

78 votes

Pickett Furniture Makes Reclaimed Wood Fun with a Gaming Table, Giant Clock and Other Playful Accoutrements

Pickett Furniture, Jeremy Pickett, BKLYN Design, BKLYN Design 2014, BKLYN Design 2014 Finalist, reclaimed wood, furniture, green furniture, design, wood working, wood furniture, bamboo, handcrafted furniture, locally sourced wood, green construction materials

Who says reclaimed wood furniture can’t be fun? Jeremy Pickett of Pickett Furniture made a case for the latter with his gaming table made of reclaimed red oak beams. The table is just one of Pickett’s projects that mixes personality with creative, locally crafted furniture that’s made to last.

Pickett Furniture, Jeremy Pickett, BKLYN Design, BKLYN Design 2014, BKLYN Design 2014 Finalist, reclaimed wood, furniture, green furniture, design, wood working, wood furniture, bamboo, handcrafted furniture, locally sourced wood, green construction materials

At the same booth, Pickett also had a 7-foot-high, 450-pound grandfather clock made of cast cement complete with an energy-saving and long-lasting LED clock face. “Whether it’s reclaimed wood or cement, we like working with stuff that’s durable, going to last, be heirloom quality, and handed down,” Pickett said. “Cement and concrete seemed like another material that’s going to withstand the test of time for a few generations.”



“I like making things that will last for a long time, get away from furniture that just gets tossed in the street,” Pickett expounded pointing to the Ikea just walking distance from St. Ann’s Warehouse. “It feels just wrong to buy something and just toss it.”

But ruggedness isn’t the only thing Pickett keeps in mind when creating his work. There’s also plenty of personality in his work like skateboards he fashions from bamboo wood. Additionally, Pickett carves little robots with magnetic limbs from scraps of wood.

“There was some leftover wood from a project and instead of just tossing it or burning it, let’s make a product with it,” Pickett said. “These pieces they could be made from the smallest scraps of wood from a large project, so we’re trying to use up every last piece of wood.”

Pickett himself says he comes from a family of wood makers but the craft skipped a few generations until he apprenticed with a cabinet shop in Jersey City for a year and a half. Before taking on wood working full time, Pickett used work at wood shops a few weeks at a time in between his tours with a music band. Eventually Pickett settled down with a wife and home when he started working on project for his home and eventually it became his lively hood. Since then Pickett has been honing his craft over the last 13 years.

“It was just so much more fun to get back into [wood working],” Pickett recalled.

+ Pickett Furniture

Images © Kevin Lee for Inhabitat
78 votes

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