UHURU Chars Reclaimed Cedar Poles to Create Striking Ebony Tables and Chairs

57 votes

UHURU Chars Reclaimed Cedar Poles to Create Striking Ebony Tables and Chairs

bklyn designs, bklyn designs 2014, Brooklyn, eco design, foldaway beds, furniture festival, brooklyn design, brooklyn made design, locally-built furniture, modular furniture, nyc, sustainable design, sustainable furniture, uhuru, uhuru furniture

Anyone familiar with UHURU Design knows that they represent Brooklyn to the fullest - but that doesn't mean they don't also incorporate inspiration from around the globe into their work. For their latest collection, which will be showing at BKLYN Designs 2014, the Red Hook-based furniture designers applied the ancient Japanese technique of shou sugi ban, which preserves wood by charring it. The method was used on reclaimed cedar poles sourced in the Pacific Northwest to create a limited edition release of striking ebony tables and stools.



bklyn designs, bklyn designs 2014, Brooklyn, eco design, foldaway beds, furniture festival, brooklyn design, brooklyn made design, locally-built furniture, modular furniture, nyc, sustainable design, sustainable furniture, uhuru, uhuru furniture

UHURU brought the decades-old cedar poles to their Red Hook studio to be cut and charred using the shou sugi ban method, which was traditionally used in Japan to preserve home siding. The pieces were then finished with a non-toxic, plant-based oil. Only 25 tables and stools were fabricated, making for a very limited and exclusive run.


In addition to paying homage to one of the earliest known wood preservation processes, UHURU stayed true to its eco-conscious ethos and chose to use reclaimed wood for this latest collection. Is it just us, or are the resulting stools totally reminiscent of UHURU's earlier scrap metal Stoolens?

+ UHURU Design

57 votes

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