Ali Kriscenski

BORDBAR RECYCLED AIRPLANE TROLLEYS

by , 08/18/07

Bordbar recycled airplane trolleys, recycled airplane trolleys, Stephan Boltz, recycled trolleys, recycled design, reclaiming design

A scratch here, a ding there – it’s all part of the charm that Bordbar airplane trolleys bring to their second life on the ground. When retired from long hauls at a comfortable cruising altitude, these functional pieces get a redesign from Cologne-based creative Stephan Boltz for use in homes, offices, retail, restaurants, or anywhere a little stylish storage is needed.


Bordbar recycled airplane trolleys, recycled airplane trolleys, Stephan Boltz, recycled trolleys, recycled design, reclaiming design

Starting at a base price of 899EU ($1225USD), Bordbar recycled airplane trolleys can be completely customized inside and out. Exterior motifs for the 103cm-high units range from a solid color palette to exquisite cityscape silhouettes to bold prints to your own design. Inside, shelves and drawers can be added and arranged to suit any new purpose.

The original intent and functionality of these reclaimed containers remains intact- the door can swing a full 270 degrees, lie flat against the trolley’s side and, in case things get bumpy, lock in place with a magnet. The trolley’s former dry ice drawer is now a cool place to store small essentials and the footbrake that kept things stable during take-off keeps things secure on terra firma.

An extractable table that slides from the trolley’s top at three lockable stops brings extended capabilities such as a spot for computer accessories or, in a not so far removed application, a place to mix drinks as they did in style under the lights at the 2007 International Furniture Fair in Cologne, Germany.

In addition to easily lending themselves to reuse, these aviation accoutrements are built to last. The premium materials have already proven their durability on flights around the globe. Who knows, perhaps you’ve even met yours before on a London-Paris leg or a non-stop to New York.

+ Bordbar

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


11 Comments

  1. piwai December 24, 2009 at 3:58 pm

    What can you have for 1000US$ (or even 2000) that would be unique? Ikea can provide you with some stuff, but they won’t be unique, tousand of other people will have the same home. In adition, Airplane trolleys are strong, They will last forever…ikea doesn’t last. Instead of throwing away those carts, I think it is such a good thing that they can be used again. And I find them fun. Congratulations!!! piwai73@hotmail.fr

  2. danielfrance73 April 24, 2009 at 12:14 pm

    that\’s so expensive for trolleys wich are already used…why it\’s so expensive ????

  3. alex March 13, 2008 at 4:55 pm

    don’t worry guys. ikea will just come out with their own version for $100 in a few months after they see this… ;)

  4. Recycling the unexpecte... March 13, 2008 at 3:57 pm

    [...] happens to those oddly shaped airplane trolleys when the airlines are done using them? Well, so did Bordbar before they began appropriating and adding splashes of design to them and reselling them to the [...]

  5. 10 Creative Ways to Rec... March 13, 2008 at 3:11 pm

    [...] happens to those oddly shaped airplane trolleys when the airlines are done using them? Well, so did Bordbar before they began appropriating and adding splashes of design to them and reselling them to the [...]

  6. Jk February 29, 2008 at 6:05 am

    can i know what is the original length of the food trolley on the plane

  7. lisa December 23, 2007 at 12:26 pm

    Good luck finding an airline trolley in a dumpster. These are not 4 sided boxes unless your idea of a box contains pull out shelving, drawers and wheels. $1200 is a bit steep but maybe they can work on the price. I think its a great idea and for sub $1000, I’d buy it.

  8. Rob September 14, 2007 at 5:35 pm

    1225$ that’s highway robbery…

    it’s nothing more then a 4 sided box with a decal printed on it, put on 4 casters and once “used”

    no thanks!!!

  9. Jac September 12, 2007 at 5:28 am

    That’s just too expensive! I would say US$100-$500 is a better estimate of consumers’ expectations, depending on how much it’s being modified.

  10. Angie Montreal August 22, 2007 at 5:06 pm

    It they’re so functional why aren’t the airlines still using them?

  11. royalestel August 20, 2007 at 9:39 pm

    $1,225 is that right? For a used trolley? I’m thinking I’ll dumpster dive something like this instead. Call it the cheapskate in me.

  • Read Inhabitat

  • Search Categories

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

  • Browse by Keyword

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home