Kristine Lofgren

Brad Pitt Promises to Make it Right with Rotting New Orleans Homes

by , 01/05/14

Make it Right Foundation, Make it Right New Orleans, New Orleans Lower 9th Ward, Post-Katrina construction, building post-Katrina, Hurricane Katrina, Brad Pitt, Brad Pitt Make it Right, TimberSIL, rotting timber in New Orleans homes, TimberSIL rotting, non profit foundation, Make it Right New Orleans, Brad Pitt non profit, Make it Right rotting wood, Make it Right homes

Some of the homes built by actor Brad Pitt’s Make it Right foundation, a non-profit responsible for constructing 100 homes in New Orleans after hurricane Katrina, are beginning to rot despite being only a few years old. The glass-infused wood product used to construct parts of the homes has begun showing signs of decay, which some home owners claim is causing their houses to rot “from the inside out.” Make it Right has been quick to, um, make things right by working with home owners to replace the suspect wood.

Make it Right Foundation, Make it Right New Orleans, New Orleans Lower 9th Ward, Post-Katrina construction, building post-Katrina, Hurricane Katrina, Brad Pitt, Brad Pitt Make it Right, TimberSIL, rotting timber in New Orleans homes, TimberSIL rotting, non profit foundation, Make it Right New Orleans, Brad Pitt non profit, Make it Right rotting wood, Make it Right homes

Although the actual extent of the damage is unclear – some home owners claim that the entire structure is rotting, while the foundation claims that the wood was only used on exterior stairs and porches – it is evident that the wood product is unable to withstand New Orlean’s sub-tropical climate. The product, known as TimberSIL, was used to construct the buildings because it is chemical-free. This means that the product can be mulched and composted once it is no longer in use.

The foundation is known for its experimental nature that supports innovative solar-powered homes, rainwater collectors and groundbreaking architecture, so of course not every new product is going to be perfect.

Pitt issued a statement saying that, “Make It Right is ambitious and tries new things all the time in order to make our homes better. Where we find innovative products that didn’t perform, we move quickly to correct these things for our homeowners.”

Although not every home has shown signs of decay, the foundation intends to replace the wood in all of the Katrina homes they built, whether rot is evident or not. The foundation also says that it is exploring its legal options with the product’s manufacturer.

Via Huffington Post and The Advocate

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


9 Comments

  1. Simon Taté January 6, 2014 at 12:08 am

    use concrete panels do it right the first time and it lasts 500 years

  2. Oy Maggie January 6, 2014 at 12:02 am

    Brad Pitt should run for mayor!

  3. brownlace January 5, 2014 at 2:47 pm

    I\’m just glad they are doing something about it.

  4. jetgraphics January 4, 2014 at 10:47 pm

    Wood frame in NOLA?
    [] Hot [] humid [] termites [] mold [] flooding [] fire risk

    Why didn’t they build with concrete block or something less susceptible to attack?

  5. cwm January 4, 2014 at 3:51 pm

    This article is not aptly titled.
    The title is provocative, probably purposefully so, and designed to incite anger. After reading the article, I’m happy to find out that the main point is NOT that certain products don’t have the longevity the foundation and homeowners had hoped for, but that the foundation is doing it’s part to fix that in homes where it’s a problem, and even going so far as to prevent it in other homes that use the same product. I’d say they’re setting a great example. The headline suggests otherwise, and in a culture where many read only the headline in their facebook feed, this will lead to conversations about how “those make it right people are screwing over those poor black folks in the 9th ward.” I don’t know if this is the intent of the author, if she thought such a headline would help her article go viral, or if the author has just been unwittingly influenced by popular, if unsavory, practices that have unfortunately become the norm. Going viral can be a great thing if it heightens public awareness, but when it aims to swing popular opinion away from an informed point of view, then it is distasteful.
    Ms. Lofgren, I would think there might be a glaring headline opportunity within the name of the foundation itself.

  6. CRCorda January 4, 2014 at 12:18 pm

    I object to your headline!.. Very Unfair. To state the houses are \”already rotting\” is to cast dispersion where they do not belong. Mr. Pitt has shown great initiative and empathy with this foundation. To suggest, as your headline does, that Mr. Pitt or his Foundation deliberately did something \”cheap\” or \”shoddy\” by stating the houses are \”ALREADY\” rotting, is misplaced and mean spirited. You should be ashamed of yourselves for posting this headline. CRC

  7. RelayerM31 January 4, 2014 at 5:55 am

    On a positive note, they’re biodegradable.

  8. Celeste Martin January 3, 2014 at 11:22 pm

    Still doing good work!

  9. legalegl January 3, 2014 at 3:13 pm

    Well, they’re making it right. What else can they do?

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
What are you looking for? (Solar, HVAC, etc.)
Where are you located?