Gallery: Build Your Own Flat-Pack Micro Nomad Home for Less than $30,00...

 
The design team says their goal is to reduce consumerism by focusing on affordable sustainable housing.

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10 Comments

  1. Hank Gant February 25, 2015 at 2:53 am

    I love this house, but a 12 X 12 X 12 makes a lot more sense as far as bedroom height, a 1 ft wider bathroom and living room, and kitchen that would allow a pantry/closet at the wall in the kitchen. Seems 3 4 ft panels would work better as far as mass production, and shouldn’t affect the cost a bit, if not lower it.

  2. myajda February 13, 2015 at 4:55 pm

    Where does the solid waste go?

  3. Tyler Macy March 1, 2014 at 9:24 pm

    Ready to be shipped anywhere on the planet, yes. Ready to be lived in, no. This design would not function well in tropical nor norther climetas. Even temperate climates with large day/night temperature swings would suffer.

    Tiny house = good. Universal “one-size-fits-all” house = bad. This functions really well as a Sketchup model

    Also, this would be like living in a cheap piece of IKEA furniture, which may be fine for some people. According to the drawings this will be glued together like a toy.

    Cheers

  4. rossthompson February 4, 2014 at 6:23 am

    This is a great concept and I was wondering how much more you could do for $5oooo
    its hard to tell from pictures but is it two stories with the bathroom upstairs?
    Also it is really annoying how your webpage jumps around constantly.

  5. Sal Cuciti February 3, 2014 at 5:17 pm

    Although you might be able to make some type a box of similar size for less, the design and craftsmanship of this home shines through. I like it.

    The problems as I see it; first economic – if a plot of land is $60,000 – $100,0000 then its sort of a waste to put a 10’x 10′ home on it. The second problem is zoning — many towns require minimum square footage. Finally, the context for this is probably an isolated or wooded lot, which in itself adds to the inhabitants carbon footprint. For an infill urban lot, you need to build to fit into the context of the neighborhood. I believe that model is ultimately the greenest one of all. I’m just not sure this would fit into many historic neighborhoods.

  6. lnwlf December 6, 2013 at 10:07 am

    Can you provide floorplans with the kitchen and bath I don’t see them??

  7. Jimmy Le November 21, 2013 at 8:50 pm

    I checked out the site, and there’s a shower head located in the bathroom.

  8. Urban Gal November 12, 2013 at 6:37 am

    It seems way overpriced, at $30,000. Or course, that’s relative to the context of the city in which it is located.
    But think about it… One could buy the materials at Home Depot for alot less, and hire a contractor to set it up, totaling way less than $30,000.
    So, this is both innovative in its micro design, and a bit of an ego stretch to call it sustainably affordable.

  9. Andrew Hobold November 11, 2013 at 8:15 am

    Anyone notice that there is no shower or bath?

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