When design studio UNarquitectura was commissioned to design a house by a creek in Curacaví, they also received one more request: to make the home emulate a treehouse. The architects responded with the design of a simple modern shelter elevated over a creek and high into the canopy so to completely immerses the homeowners among the trees. Full-height windows installed in the compact home blur the line between indoor and outdoor living, and fill the interior with natural light and lush forest views.



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Casa Quebrada is a tiny home due to site restrictions that limited the build to no more than 40 square meters. The tiny cabin successfully fits all the living needs into one compact space but avoids the feeling of claustrophobia due to a fully glazed wall that visually extends the living room to the outdoors. The house is clad in pine wood painted black to help the home blend into the forest, topped with a tin roof, and raised on stilts so as not to interrupt the flow of water in winter. In contrast with its dark facade, the interior is painted bright white.

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Instead of a symmetrical gabled roof, the architects introduced a break in the roofline to install a clerestory window. The floor plan also steps up at that point, creating a level change between the living area in the front and the bedroom in the rear. The tiny home is accessed via a timber boardwalk that also connects the shelter with an older existing house. “I think the achievement of this project lies mainly in having conjugate client requests with good adaptation to the environment where it is located,” said Alejandro Urruitia of UNarquitectura.

+ UNarquitectura

Via ArchDaily

Images via UNarquitectura