The first thing you notice about the yurt is its sturdy construction. With 2″ fiberglass insulation in the walls and 2″ polyiso foam in the roof, the cabins stay warm despite the cold weather snap that just pushed through the west. The owners of the music studio bolster the insulated cabins with a tiny infrared heater, and if it gets too warm, a dome lifter capping the space can be elevated to let warm air escape. The second thing you notice are the door and windows, neither of which are endemic to traditional Mongolian yurts. While it may detract from the novelty, it makes the cabin feel like a real home, and the low-e double paned glass contributes to its energy efficiency while permitting natural light to penetrate the interior.

Related: Why our ancestors built round houses and why it still makes sense to do so today

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A small canopy over the front door and heavy duty Duro-Last fabric on the exterior provide excellent protection against the elements, and the latter drastically reduces maintenance requirements. We were particularly impressed by the beautiful craftsmanship that goes into each yurt – especially the traditional tongue and groove ceiling.

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Freedom Yurt Cabins offer several models and sizes, all of which are customizable and all of which can be shipped pretty much anywhere in the world. From a 12-wall cabin to a 16-wall cabin, prices range from about $16,000 to $20,000 – which includes the floor structure, so it’s not necessary to build a platform every time you move. And when you leave, hardly anyone will notice you were ever there at all.

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Of course, you’ll have to add a few touches to the shell to make the home truly livable – including plumbing and electricity – but Josh Barry, whose father designed the yurt cabins, tells Inhabitat this is incredibly easy to do. And if you really want to get off the grid, simply add a ground solar system and you’re good to go.

+ Freedom Yurt Cabins

All images via Tafline Laylin for Inhabitat