sustainable sourced timber, rainwater harvesting, thermal mass, sustainable timber, high-performance glass, Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach, Bluesy Beach architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4 by Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4, indoor/outdoor living, eco-friendly bungalow, Australian architecture

While the original weather-beaten homes on Bluesy Beach comprise simple fibro or weatherboard structures, the new buildings that take their place are often large suburban homes that “have little recognition of place and relate poorly to the immediate context,” write the architects. When the clients commissioned Bourne Blue Architecture for their new home, they asked for a modest dwelling that “fit in well with the context,” retained the existing pair of large Angophora trees, and made the most of the views of the grassland and forested hills at the rear.

sustainable sourced timber, rainwater harvesting, thermal mass, sustainable timber, high-performance glass, Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach, Bluesy Beach architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4 by Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4, indoor/outdoor living, eco-friendly bungalow, Australian architecture

The architects responded with the 119-square-meter Blueys Beach House, an L-shaped building that grouped the three bedrooms into a rectangular mass to the northeast, and positioned the open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen to the southwest. The sleeping quarters and communal area are connected via an indoor/outdoor patio and the home is accessed through the spacious carport. Large high-performance windows and sliding doors punctuate the rooms to give the home a sense of openness and are strategically arranged to preserve privacy.

Related: Australia’s Pittwater House opens and closes with timber shade facade

sustainable sourced timber, rainwater harvesting, thermal mass, sustainable timber, high-performance glass, Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach, Bluesy Beach architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4 by Bourne Blue Architecture, Bluesy Beach House 4, indoor/outdoor living, eco-friendly bungalow, Australian architecture

Sustainably sourced timber dominates the material palette. Other materials for the home, such as the polished concrete floors and external stone pathways, were chosen for their resistance to corrosion, value, and how they related to the village context. The folded zigzag roof facilitates rainwater harvesting for reuse in the bathrooms, laundry, and irrigation. Correctly oriented for thermal mass, the energy-efficient home is equipped with heavy insulation and is heated by heat pump-based hot water technology.

+ Bourne Blue Architecture

Via ArchDaily

Images via Bourne Blue Architecture