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Could a Spillway Bar Pavilion Manage Seine Flooding in Paris?

by , 07/22/14

With water levels rising worldwide, there’s a very real risk of floods in any city that has a river at its core, and architect Dr. Margot Krasojević has envisioned a dynamic pavilion that could play a vital role in Paris’ flood control infrastructure. An enclosed circular glass bar rests over a bell mouth spillway, allowing water to enter from its entire perimeter and move into the channel. The circular bar directs water through ramps into the spillway, which is situated beneath a moveable glass floor. The bar’s industrial function is combined with a monocoque shell, showcasing the interior’s reflective nature as it supports the water’s weight. Etched glass adds an ethereal feel to the lattice structure, filtering water as it’s channeled upstream into nearby reservoirs via submerged canals.

This manner of flood protection is as beautiful as it is utilitarian, and would certainly do justice to La Ville-Lumière.

+ Dr. Margot Krasojević 

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5 Comments

  1. Margot Krasojevic Margot Krasojevic July 25, 2014 at 2:16 pm

    1. The River Seine is not a canal, it’s a river whose water levels are effected by heavy rains. The spillway is an entrance to a submerged water infrasturcture which directs flood water to the nearby reservoirs via the spillway.
    2. This project has nothing to do with rising oceans, please look at the following video which shows what torrential rains do to the city of Paris, in turn affecting the Seine water levels:
    http://youtu.be/SYkKM6VPz2Q
    3. The spillway is designed with a water filtration system attached to the underside. Floating River barges and bars have been used for a ong time now.
    4. A monocoque shell is flexible and can withstand forces from multiple directions much more than if there were joints within the structure, please refer to alluminium and resin monocoque boat designs that manage to sustain forces in open seas.

  2. margot@margotkrasojevic... July 25, 2014 at 2:14 pm

    1. The River Seine is not a canal, it’s a river whose water levels are effected by heavy rains. The spillway is an entrance to a submerged water infrasturcture which directs flood water to the nearby resvoirs via the spillway.
    2. Nothing to do with rising oceans, please look at the following video which shows what torrential rains do to the city of Paris, in turn affecting the Seine water levels:
    http://youtu.be/SYkKM6VPz2Q
    3. The spillway is designed with a water filtration system attached to the underside. Floating River barges and bars have been used for a ong time now.
    4. A monocoque shell is flexible and can withstand forces from multiple directions much more than if there were joints within the structure, please refer to alluminium and resin monocoque boat designs that manage to sustain forces in open seas.

  3. Margot Krasojevic Margot Krasojevic July 25, 2014 at 11:56 am

    1. The River Seine is not a canal, it\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’s level rises and falls depending on rain downpours. The spillway is an entrance not to a waterway infrasturcture which directs flood water to the nearby resvoirs.
    2. Nothing to do with rising oceans, please look at the following video which shows what torrential rains do to the city of Paris, in turn affecting the Seine water levels:
    http://youtu.be/SYkKM6VPz2Q
    3. The spillway is designed with a water filtration system attached to the underside.
    4. A monocoque shell is flexible and can withstand forces from multiple directions much more than if there were joints within the structure, please refer to alluminium and resin monocoque boat designs that manage to sustain forces in open seas.

  4. margot@margotkrasojevic... July 25, 2014 at 11:55 am

    1. The River Seine is not a canal, it\\\\\\\’s level rises and falls depending on rain downpours. The spillway is an entrance not to a waterway infrasturcture which directs flood water to the nearby resvoirs.
    2. Nothing to do with rising oceans, please look at the following video which shows what torrential rains do to the city of Paris, in turn affecting the Seine water levels:
    http://youtu.be/SYkKM6VPz2Q
    3. The spillway is designed with a water filtration system attached to the underside.
    4. A monocoque shell is flexible and can withstand forces from multiple directions much more than if there were joints within the structure, please refer to alluminium and resin monocoque boat designs that manage to sustain forces in open seas.

  5. Zeppflyer July 24, 2014 at 2:50 pm

    OK… So, it’s the entrance for a drain?

    A couple points:
    1. Water doesn’t gently flow upstream along canals. It’s pumped.
    2. Paris is more than 100 feet above sea level. Rising oceans are not going to be a concern there in any foreseeable future.
    3. The Seine is none too clean to begin with. Add in the mud and debris that will be coming in during a flooding situation and that pretty bar is going to look (and smell) pretty bad pretty quickly.
    4. A monocoque shell is a terrible structural idea for something that is going to get battered by stormwater and water-borne debris. One good crack and you have to write off the whole thing.

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