Coy Yiontis Architects, Australian Living, Australian Family Home, Australian Architecture, Wood Cladding, Modern House Extension, Minimal design, Contemporary Design, Natural Light, Limestone Flooring, Victorian Weatherboard, Melbourne Green Architecture, Australian Home Renovation

The small plot of land in Balaclava, Melbourne needed to house a family of six and provide space for the grandparents to come and stay. Generous living spaces and a swimming pool were key. The badly dilapidated original Victorian weatherboard was renovated, and the architects created an extension that is hardly noticeable from the street, but makes a huge impact for the family via contemporary design.

Coy Yiontis Architects, Australian Living, Australian Family Home, Australian Architecture, Wood Cladding, Modern House Extension, Minimal design, Contemporary Design, Natural Light, Limestone Flooring, Victorian Weatherboard, Melbourne Green Architecture, Australian Home Renovation

The new timber-clad extension’s angular form evolved as a response to planning constraints, which shaped the envelopes and floor plans of both buildings. Considered planning integrates the indoor and outdoor spaces to achieve unexpectedly voluminous communal areas. The irregular open living space flows around a central hub of service space, and travertine limestone tiles unify the floor plane, flowing from inside to outside. Bedrooms and bathrooms upstairs are modest and restful rooms, benefiting from solar shade provided by the cladding’s wooden slats. Bathroom and kitchen are light, bright, and streamlined thanks to large skylights and reflective white surfaces.

Related: The Colour House in Melbourne wins 2014 Australian Living Green Interior Award

The old part of the house retains its own unique character, and is linked to the two-storey extension by a central courtyard. The old house was reconfigured to become an office, library, living room and guest bedroom. At the rear, an elegant glass walkway links the two structures, and the swimming pool sits framed by both buildings. Inside the glazed link, a built-in daybed borders the pool and gives the occupants a place to enjoy the morning sun.

+ Coy Yiontis Architects

Via Contemporist

Photography by Peter Clarke