Beth Buczynski

Cute Micro House Made from Recycled Tin Cans and Trader Joe's Shopping Bags Pops Up in Portland

by , 12/23/13
filed under: Architecture, Tiny Homes



Portland houses, Portland architecture, Tiny Homes in Portland, Micro homes, micro-houses, upcycled architecture, green building, reclaimed materials, Trader Joe's, wine cellar, upcycled wallpaper, upcycled siding

“This whole [tiny home] movement is about originality and creativity,” says Phoenix, who lives in the upcycled cottage, in the Fair Companies video above. She believes that while builders might be tempted to create cookie cutter houses that are ready for re-sale, those looking to live in a micro-home should strive to use unique features and materials that make it possible to reduce impact while honoring the character that sets them apart.

Many tiny homes are so eager to appear spacious they forget that there are a lot of unique things you can do with 364 square feet. Phoenix, who left her 3,500 square foot home in Maryland for life in a mini-cottage, enjoys features like a porch swing made from a salvaged Dairy Queen bench, flower boxes made from old stove hoods, metal siding made from tomato sauce cans hammered flat, folding/modular furniture, wall paper made from Trader Joe’s shopping bags, dry wall made from used Pinto Bean sacks, and (get this) a wine and champagne caddy that pops out of the floor!

Both Phoenix and her son, who lives in the tiny house as well, say they have no desire to move back into a cavernous McMansion any time soon.

Via Treehugger

Special thanks to Kirsten Dirksen of Fair Companies for providing still images.

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2 Comments

  1. SandyTodd January 5, 2014 at 7:30 pm

    Wait until they’re weathered for ten years and then we can call them tin-roof shacks. Aw, progress. So cute.

  2. Viveka December 26, 2013 at 7:14 am

    I really love the idea of the Mirco house, but there is one problem with them. Everyone I’ve seen features a sleeping loft accessible via a ladder. But what about someone like me age 65 who soon will not be able to go up and down ladders? Seems like someone should start designing something with the sleeping facility, perhaps as a convertible bed, downstairs and some kind of dumb waiter arrangement for the loft for storage.

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