Gallery: Daimler Announces Plans for B-Class E-Cell Plug-in Hybrid With...

 

Daimler is working hard to integrate wireless inductive charging into their B-Class E-Cell plug-in hybrid, and they say they have nearly achieved success. Inductive charging is a system by which a vehicle or other electronic device can be charged simply by being placed above or on a charging plate. The problem up till now has been that this system isn’t a very efficient way to charge a vehicle, but Daimler says they have achieved efficiencies of 90% already.

Other automakers like Nissan, Toyota, Volvo, and even Rolls-Royce are currently working on similar systems, and electronics companies are also investigating wireless charging devices for the whole home, so you wouldn’t even have to place your car or electronics on a charging pad in order to juice them up. Daimler is working with Conductix-Wampfler and the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety to complete its mission. Would you buy a hybrid or electric car that charged inductively? What about whole house wireless charging systems? Let us know your thoughts in comments.

+ Daimler

+ Conductix-Wampfler

Via AutoBlog Green

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2 Comments

  1. johnny mars December 6, 2011 at 10:54 am

    No, not until it was proven safe. There are just to many microwaves flying around this earth from cell phones, wi-fi, broadcasts, etc. It’s all one big experiment so far.

  2. baazorg December 6, 2011 at 8:39 am

    Love the idea. Especially if it can be used while moving. Imagine a car like that Opel/GM that uses electric motors with batteries charged by a petrol engine. If the battery could additionally be charged while parked and while traveling on specially kitted roads, it would leave the petrol supply for only the longest journeys.

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