art, artists, Marian Bantjes, coexistence poster, Alliance Graphique International, natural materials, typography, typographic design

The painstaking process started with a pencil drawing of the geometric pattern and lettering that says “Coexistence”. She then added the soil and sand, using a variety of methods. She was able to pour some from a spout, while others had to be added in an even layer and then moved with a paintbrush. “The materials vary in size of grains and evenness,” Bantjes told Co.Design. “The smoothest sand from Thailand was the easiest to work with. Other sands were lumpy or sticky with salt.”

Related: Artist Kathy Klein creates amazing mandalas with flowers and seeds

“Everyone who has seen this mentions the Tibetan sandpaintings,” Bantjes said on her blog. “I can’t say I had Tibet in mind when I made this. Merely Coexistence.” However, like sand paintings and traditional mandalas, the sand in Bantjes’s striking work was not glued down. After photographing the design, she swept the sand away, destroying the original artwork.

art, artists, Marian Bantjes, coexistence poster, Alliance Graphique International, natural materials, typography, typographic design

Her intricate designs have been collected in two books: the 2010 volume I Wonder and the 2014 monograph Marian Bantjes: Pretty Pictures.

+ Marian Bantjes

Via Co.Design

Images via Marian Bantjes