Studio 59, Folding House, small houses, architecture, belgium design, belgium home design, Valerie Van de Put, interior design, doorless houses, green design, belgium interior design, asymmetric design, asymmetrical homes

The design of the split-level Folding House was based heavily on the natural landscape of the Belgian region of Maasmechelen. The irregular design mimics the surrounding sloping hills that, in addition to providing a feeling of protection, also created a natural boundary between public and private space on the interior.

Studio 59, Folding House, small houses, architecture, belgium design, belgium home design, Valerie Van de Put, interior design, doorless houses, green design, belgium interior design, asymmetric design, asymmetrical homes

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The asymmetricity of the floor plan is even more noticeable in the interior where “folded floors” break up the living and office space. The unique interior layout with its various levels and sloped flooring follows the contour of the natural landscape, creating an open continuity from the front area of the studio to the expansive garden area in the back. The lack of doors enhances the openness of the design. Stark white walls contrast with concrete flooring, creating an industrial feel throughout the interior.

Studio 59, Folding House, small houses, architecture, belgium design, belgium home design, Valerie Van de Put, interior design, doorless houses, green design, belgium interior design, asymmetric design, asymmetrical homes

According to the architect, the resulting design brings her peaceful inspiration for her work, “When a place lets you feel peaceful and inspired, it is your dream home.”

+ Studio 59

Via Architizer

Photography by Frederik Vercruysse