Gallery: Dow Agrosciences to Use Agent Orange-Modified Corn in Battle A...

 

US pharmaceutical company Dow Agrosciences wants to fight superweeds with corn that has been genetically modified to incorporate a component of the Vietnam war defoliant Agent Orange. It is a bizarre plan to say the least. While superweeds have impacted over 15 million acres of farmland, Agent One is a toxic defoliant that was used by the US military in Vietnam as part of its herbicidal warfare program. In fact, the Red Cross of Vietnam estimates that up to 1 million people are disabled or have health problems due to the use of Agent Orange, including 500,000 children born with birth defects.

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2 Comments

  1. Eddie Lutz February 18, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Terrific! Another toxic herbicide that you can’t wash off because it’s part of the plant.

  2. Harald Sandø February 13, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    This is so unbelievable insane. First they make roundup, then they modify soybeans to resist roundup, and now so-called weeds have become resistant as well. All in the name of Profit. Not for people, but for profit.

    Why? Because weeds can easily be controlled by organic no-till farming. ORGANIC NO-TILL FARMING. Google it. This is 100% sustainable and pollution free and lots of US farmers have practiced it for over 20 years. This builds up the soil and makes herbicides, pesticides and chemical fertilizers obsolete.

    But of course, there’s no money in this for evil companies like Monsanto. Now, I will modify that. It is not Monsanto that is evil, they, as the rest of us, are victims of the mindset of the monetary system which NEEDS monetary profit for it’s members to survive.

    The alternative? A resource based economy. Google it as well. This is the true Economy (which means ‘proper management of available resources’).

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