It’s been an exhilarating year for green cars. From new hydrogen vehicle records to the Tesla Model 3 unveiling, a sustainable automobile future seems closer than ever. Building on the excitement, Dutch politicians recently proposed a bold plan to ban all gas- and diesel-powered cars by 2025.

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The proposal brought forth by members of the PvdA party includes a ban on all emissions-releasing cars, including hybrid vehicles. Under the measure, in less than 10 years car dealers would only be allowed to offer electric– or hydrogen-powered vehicles.

PvdA representatives also called for increased government investment in self-driving vehicles, which they say could solve Holland’s persistent traffic issue.

Related: The 10 best electric vehicles for every buyer

While a majority in the Tweede Kamer, the lower house of Parliament, approved the measure, it met with resistance from the other main party in Holland’s Parliament. Members of the VDD party condemned the idea, saying it was “overambitious and unrealistic.” Minister of Economic Affairs Henk Kamp, a member of VDD, estimated that in 2025, only around 15 per cent of vehicles in the country will be electric.

PvdA isn’t united, however; some members of the party worry banning gas-powered vehicles would turn off voters. Others said they weren’t consulted on the proposal and learned about it via headlines rather than members of their party.

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Jan Vos, who presented the proposal, said, “It is a vision piece…It’s not that this is going to happen right away.” He said Holland should follow in the footsteps of countries such as Denmark, Norway, and Uruguay, and end their reliance on fossil fuels. As of now it appears the ambitious idea is unlikely to be enacted into law, but it will be interesting to see how other policymakers around the world respond.

Via Digital Trends

Images via Wikimedia Commons (1,2)