Mike Chino

Transparent Solar Windows Set to Energize Homes

by , 04/14/08

Queensland University of Technology, John Bell, solar, energy, transparent, windows, renewable Dyesol, technology, solarglass1.jpg

The Queensland University of Technology recently announced that it has been working with Dyesol to develop an innovative solar cell technology that re-envisions windows as clear, clean energy providers. Professor John Bell has said that these dye-infused solar cells would significantly reduce building energy costs, and could even generate surplus energy to be stored or sold. The development has been touted as the most promising advance in solar cell technology since the invention of the silicon cell.

Modern architecture has a love-hate relationship with windows: they contribute light and levity to interior spaces, yet they are the most frequently cited culprits for thermal energy loss. Traditional approaches to the problem have tended towards increasing insular ability, however this new development would imbue windows with power producing capabilities, actually providing energy instead of leaking it.

Dyesol’s solar cells use an innovative technology called “artificial photosynthesis”, wherein a dye analogous to chlorophyll absorbs light to generate electricity. The panels are composed of “an electrolyte, a layer of titania (a pigment used in white paints and tooth paste), and ruthenium dye sandwiched between glass. Light striking the dye excites electrons which are absorbed by the titania to become an electric current.”

Dye solar cells are cheaper and require less energy to manufacture than silicon cells, since they don’t require expensive raw materials. They also produce electricity more efficiently, even in instances of “shadowing”, where overcast skies and shadows from trees and other buildings can cause a loss in collected power.

These solar windows will offer an enticing new option for skyscrapers and houses looking to break the zero-energy barrier – imagine the net power that a floor-to-ceiling glass-walled skyscraper could produce! Current cells have a rosy tint, although blue, grey and green cells are in the works. Dyesol says the panels will be commercially available over the next few years.

+ Dyesol
+ Queensland University of Technology

Via enn.com

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


9 Comments

  1. SELARAND August 22, 2012 at 7:10 pm

    HELL I WOULD LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT SOLAR WINDOWS
    WE ARE A YOUNG CO WANTING TO SALE AND INSTAL THEM
    SO PLEASE GET BACK TO US IF YOU WILL

    THANK YOU.
    YOURS MR. LAWRENCE ANDERSON.

  2. wolvercat August 5, 2012 at 4:39 pm

    wher eactly can I actually buy these types of windows for my new company?! Please email me company names and their addresses or phone numbers. I am serious about wanting to employ this technology! Thankx.

    ~Wolvercat

  3. shakil khan December 4, 2010 at 7:33 pm

    Dear Sir / Madam,
    I decided to install transparent solar systems in some 4/5 star hotels situated near sea beach of COX’S BAZAR – the largest one in this planet. may I get your co-operation ?

    SHAKIL KHAN
    CEO
    REAL GREEN POWER
    Mobile : 01824775700

  4. Bhagat September 22, 2009 at 6:52 am

    We are interested to know more about the Solar Windows,Viz Cost /Sq mere, Can it be cut to required size, Power generated per sqm, how to store energy from various panels, Circuit dagram & electrical panel

  5. buddy March 7, 2009 at 8:51 pm

    How can we buy them?

  6. alyaly November 24, 2008 at 8:29 am

    is it available in Canada?

  7. rhinolover May 27, 2008 at 4:14 pm

    i would like to know ifthere are solar winndows i can use just for a roof

  8. Green Patent Blog &raqu... May 15, 2008 at 8:56 pm

    [...] Australian solar cell company Dyesol has developed transparent dye-infused solar cells that can be sandwiched between two panes of glass to transform windows into energy collection devices.  In a process based on how plants generate energy, Dyesol’s cells use a dye analogous to chlorophyll to absorb light and generate electrical energy.  The cell consists of a nano-particulate porous film formed on a conductive substrate, a layer of dye, a transparent conductor and an electrolyte placed between the dye and the substrate.  The dye-coated nano-particles increase the surface area available for light absorption.  (read more about the technology on Ecogeek and Inhabitat) [...]

  9. Scott April 15, 2008 at 11:11 pm

    Fun stuff, What makes this different different than the other integrated systems that are already out on the market?

  • Read Inhabitat

  • Search Categories

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

  • Browse by Keyword

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
What are you looking for? (Solar, HVAC, etc.)
Where are you located?