Timon Singh

Europeans Are More Worried About the Environment Than the Economic Crisis

by , 10/11/11
filed under: global warming

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A new poll indicates that two out of three Europeans see climate change as a more serious problem than the global economic crisis. Sixty-eight percent of those polled saw climate change as a very serious problem (up from 64 percent in 2009), while 80 percent saw it as either ‘very serious’ or ‘fairly serious’. Maybe it is because the rich are getting richer and many see the climate as an easier thing to fix than the current economic market, but it seems that many Europeans are more concerned about the glaciers than national debt.

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It is striking that the public is even more concerned about climate change than it was in the run-up to the Copenhagen Climate Conference. In particular, the fact that more than three out of four Europeans see improving energy efficiency as a way to create new jobs is a strong signal to Europe’s decision makers,” said Connie Hedegaard, European Commissioner for Climate Action, speaking to TG Daily. “I see this poll very much as an encouragement also for us in the Commission to continue fighting for ambitious and concrete climate action in Europe.”

However climate change was not the most serious issue Europeans care about. The biggest problem facing the world? Poverty, hunger and a lack of drinking water – which you can argue are all issues linked to climate change.

As for the US, according to a similar poll carried out by Yale and George Mason universities earlier in the year, only 64 percent of Americans even believed that the world was warming, and less than half believed that climate change was caused by human activities. Considering that the average American produces three times the CO2 emissions of a person in France, this European author can only suggest that a major drive in environmental education and energy efficiency is needed Stateside.

Via TG Daily

Images © Radar Communication and david_shankbone

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