Gallery: SUSTAINABLE STYLE SUNDAY: John Patrick Organic

 

John Patrick’s Organic line was a pleasant surprise during the recent Fall Fashion Week. The company launched this Spring with casual yet polished looks that could easily fit into any wardrobe. Highlights from that collection follow, but the Fall line (above photo and bottom photos) appeared to be even better. The fabrications were gorgeous and included vegetable-tanned leather, whisper-soft cashmeres and organic wool, cotton and velvet. Even the recycled cotton looked good. The modern take on classics done in muted shades definitely made an impression. Organic broadens the horizons of eco-conscious fashion and is a welcome addition to the sustainable style wardrobe. Also, be sure to pick up the green issue of Domino coming out soon. John Patrick Organic is featured, but after having a peek at the issue last week, I can confirm it is chock full of green goodness.

Available at Kaight, Sodafine and Diana Kane. + John Patrick Organic

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11 Comments

  1. Joe February 10, 2008 at 4:45 pm

    If I could add my 0.02, I think your site and models look great.

    I came across your blog and found it to be very interesting. I have just launched a new apparel company, ‘Brand of the Free’ and thought I would share this information with you.

    The Brand of the Free line of apparel provides authentic American grown and manufactured graphic clothing for men and women. They embody thought provoking graphics to promote conversation about American pride and our environment. The shirts also feature low impact dyes with graphics printed using water based, low impact ink to help preserve the planet. All shirts are manufactured in America with the highest standards in a sweat shop free, fair wage environment.

    Please visit our web site at http://www.brandofthefree.net
    I would appreciate your comments

  2. eddie April 10, 2007 at 12:08 pm

    while i don’t think this is the space to discuss why models do or don’t smile, there is a very intelligent discussion on the subject in a blog i like which might be of interest to some of you:

    http://tierneylab.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/02/23/solved-the-mystery-of-the-miserable-models/

  3. Jill Danyelle Jill Danyelle March 3, 2007 at 12:13 pm

    Authors Response to the Comments:

    CLEARLY, WE WILL NOT PLEASE EVERYONE WITH ONE BRAND.
    We post about avant-garde designers SANS and Nedra begins to equate sustainable clothing design with Star Trek. We post about the great-looking, easy-wearing, more classic designs of Organic and Josh thinks all organic clothing is bland. As when we wrote about leather with Terra Plana and vegan options with Stella McCartney, the idea is to offer options and cover the existing range that might fall under sustainability. It is not a mandate.

    SUSTAINABLE CLOTHING HAVING A “TREEHUGGER” LOOK.
    It seems Howard was trying to be helpful, but yet I cannot help but tell you that is incorrect. As Stephanie stated, there are so many sustainable labels that you would have a hard time picking out in a crowd as eco, it just isn’t even an issue. You can have avant-garde designs, high end designer looks and more casual clothing. The esthetic of the clothing has much less to do with being “eco” than it does with design. As I have illustrated in my Inhabitat post and over at fiftyRX3.

    THE PHOTOGRAPHY.
    For the Fall sneak peek, I took the large image and the top right image while I was at the preview during fashion week. I wanted to give readers a glimpse at what was coming because I feel the Fall collection is even stronger than the Spring. The models were busy shooting the company’s look book, so I didn’t have a million hours to get a fantastic shot. However, I think the shots are fine. Additionally, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the shots from Spring. If you pull your head out of the JCPenny catalog for a minute, you might realize the majority of fashion shots do not include smiling models.

    CONTACTING THE COMPANY.
    I have pointed Oblio in the right direction, but if you also want to be one of the many stores carrying this line… Please do not write to us, but use your web savvy and click the link to the company website, then click their link for “sales”. Then, impress them by spell checking your email and perhaps having some images of your store available, if you do not have a website.

  4. Oblio Wish March 2, 2007 at 9:45 pm

    Hello , Our website is not done yet I have been tring to get information on carring some of your organic line in my Boutique in West Palm Beach .

    Oblio Wish
    dschlick@gyrotonicsatnam.com
    561-307-2568

  5. frances February 19, 2007 at 12:57 pm

    I LOVE THESE CLOTHING MODELS AS WELL AS THE BEAUTIFUL CLOTHING THEY ARE MODELING> I LOVE THE ORGANIC FLOW OF THE MATERIAL AND HOW IT LOOKS SO REFRESHING.
    I WILL BUY FROM THIS DESIGNER FOR CERTAIN.

  6. Stephanie Z. February 13, 2007 at 5:56 pm

    I’m happy to say that there eco-designers who don’t design with “tree huggy” looks. Some of my favorites include: Twice Shy, Under the Canopy, Anna Cohen, Linda Loudermilk to name a few. Then there’s the reconstructed clothing from vintage pieces that have some spunk like preloved, junky styling, traid remade. and more are emerging all the time as jill danyelle has been reporting about for years.

    I guess it’s a matter of personal taste. And I agree with everyone that the photography works against the clothes. It’s stark for sure and very minimalist. Personally they seem more urban than treehugger, but it’s just an opinion.

  7. Howard February 13, 2007 at 5:33 am

    What most people don’t realise is that eco clothing doesn’t use the same processes that other clothing use like enzyme washing and harsh dyeing processes that non-eco company’s use. Therefore they will always look a little tree huggy – I think JPO has done a good job, its just a shame about the photography.

  8. Josh Kitts February 13, 2007 at 3:19 am

    Ugly was too strong of a word. I just feel like too much organic clothing is so bland.

  9. eric February 12, 2007 at 2:56 pm

    Do these people know its ok to be happy?

  10. Nedra February 12, 2007 at 1:21 pm

    They’re not ugly, they’re normal. I think it’s a good thing that not ALL the available sustainable clothing lines are filled with costumes that look like they’re for an extra on star trek.

  11. Josh Kitts February 12, 2007 at 1:40 am

    Not too impressed John. The clothes are boring. Of course it’s great that everything’s turning green but those pictures don’t inspire or excite me. Sustainable’s no excuse for ugly.

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