Mike Chino

Colombia's Finca el Retorno Eco-Shelters

by , 07/11/08
filed under: Architecture, Daylighting

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This striking slate gray structure unfolds from its verdant environs with a low-profile envelope that rises out from under a grassy hill. Constructed by G ateliers Architecture in Guatapé-Antioquia, Colombia, it’s one of a series of 8 ecological shelters that make strident efforts to seamlessly integrate modern architecture with local topography.


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G ateliers Architecture constructed their Finca el Retorno refuge as an eco-friendly complex that consists of a series of hiking trails, a chapel, a restaurant, and 8 shelters. Each unit is topped with an insulating green roof that seamlessly extends the slope of the hill while giving the structure a sleek profile. Inside, beautiful wood paneled walls are awash in daylight provided by integrated skylights. We love how these structures’ streamlined profiles crop out like rocky shelves, beautifully complimenting their immediate environment.

+ G ateliers Architecture

Via archdaily.com

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3 Comments

  1. Snark July 13, 2008 at 9:55 am

    Too dark and too angular to “fit into its surroundings.” Like I just said in another post – for me, too much green architecture turns into pretentious self-indulgence on the architect’s part, with urban hipster aesthetics that obliterate any connection to natural forms, nature, and the human element. I suppose some appreciate this sort of straight-edge minimalism, but it alienates me because they so consciously reject natural forms, colors, and materials. Minimalism that’s still tied to nature and humanity is possible – see Japanese architecture.

  2. leafpure July 12, 2008 at 2:52 am

    Awesome indeed. Right down my little valley. I like it- the more unlike homey it is, the better for moi.

  3. theokobox July 11, 2008 at 1:29 pm

    This is awesome – i really like the design and idea of letting the earth insulate – but the colors are kind of “cold” and looks like an iffice more then a home… maybe that’s the New Orleans in me though, who wants to live in a house of wild colors and ornate design :)

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