Yuka Yoneda

Freitag Store is World's Tallest Shipping Container Structure!

by , 05/02/11

freitag, zurich, shipping container, Freitag, Shipping Container Store, Recycled Design, Recycling in Design, Recycling in Architecture, Zurich, Green Design, prefab store, world's tallest shipping container structure,Images © FREITAG ®

The Freitag Store holds another title too. It’s also the tallest building in Zurich – of any kind. The first 2 floors of the store consist of 4 horizontal shipping containers each, giving them a sense of stability. The third and fourth floors are then pared down to just 2 horizontal containers each. Finally, the fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth floors are just one container each, making it seem like the building could topple at any moment – though that’s obviously not the case since each level has been secured thoroughly. On the top floor, there is even an observation deck with binoculars.

The bottom four floors house the actual store with displays and merchandise. The other floors contain areas for storage and a staircase that take shoppers up to the viewing platform. What a fantastic example of a company walking the walk as much as they talk the talk – extending reuse and recycling from their product line into their retail spaces.

+ Freitag

Images © FREITAG ®

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7 Comments

  1. Greenwolf May 2, 2011 at 11:38 am

    The shop is really awesome on the inside and the outside

    “It’s also the tallest building in Zurich – of any kind.”
    Thats not really the case actually, if you would look a little more to the right you would see a huge Building called the swiss prime tower with a size of 126 Meters and around there are quite some taller buildings as well.

  2. ProgressiveMonkey May 2, 2011 at 10:29 am

    I’d encourage anyone visiting Switzerland to check out the Freitag store, and the surrounding trendy-yet-somewhat-industrial area, it’s really a cool place!

    However, I’m a little surprised by Inhabitat’s article. First of all, the Freitag tower is now several years old, although I can understand that it didn’t make the headlines in the US when it was completed.

    What really surprises me is the claim that it’s the tallest building in Zürich. This is straight false, the tallest building in Zürich is the Helbling tower in Altstetten, and it’s only one of many taller buildings in the area. The climbing gym not too far from the tower is taller than it is!!

    Just sayin’, so Zürich doesn’t pass for a village :-)

  3. greenaum January 14, 2011 at 6:02 am

    I’m sure there are containers that, through rust or whatever, are no longer up to standard for shipping. If it’s more expensive to repair them up to spec, then re-certify them, than it is to build new (which is true of so many things), then this is a good use.

    OTOH I don’t recall seeing a lot of them on scrapyard piles. Perhaps a way of making homes out of old train carraiges is needed!

  4. john simmis November 16, 2010 at 2:37 pm

    If you are considering modular or prefab home, or looking for an alternative to high cost construction, building with recycled shipping containers is worth taking a look at. There are many considerations that have contributed to the appeal of building with intermodal shipping containers – availability, standardization, the recycled/green factor, economy and speed of construction, their durability, and even their “elegance/grace”.

    Good resource is the Residential Shipping Container Primer website. A SHOWCASE OF SHIPPING CONTAINER HOMES AND BUILDINGDS, AND A DO IT YOURSELF (DIY) REFERENCE FOR CONVERTING RECYCLED INTERMODAL CARGO SHIPPING CONTAINERS INTO BUILDINGS AND ARCHITECTURE.

    Lots of great example buildings, details, facts, and links to other articles. They have something new that you can setup your own project wiki to get help with your project if you are considering a design build project.

    http://www.ResidentialShippingContainerPrimer.com

  5. ztracy October 8, 2010 at 12:04 am

    agreed

  6. aardvark2626 October 4, 2010 at 10:19 pm

    Fellow designers, I truly applaud the desire to make architecture from unused manufactured good, but there is not a surplus of shipping containers. It is true that use of these containers was in a slump for a couple of years, but with the advent of a tremendous amount of Asian trade, there is actually a lack of necessary shipping vessels. Shipping container production requires a great deal of resources, so it would behoove us to keep as many in the shipping industry as possible.

  7. aardvark October 4, 2010 at 10:17 pm

    Fellow designers, I truly applaud the desire to make architecture from unused manufactured good, but there is not a surplus of shipping containers. It is true that use of these containers was in a slump for a couple of years, but with the advent of a tremendous amount of Asian trade, there is actually a lack of necessary shipping vessels. Shipping container production requires a great deal of resources, so it would behoove us to keep as many in the shipping industry as possible.

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