Mushrooms are good for so much more than just eating. Ecovative, the company behind Mushroom Packaging, has teamed up with cement-growing company bioMASON to create classy furniture grown entirely from microorganisms and mushrooms. The two companies recently unveiled their new biofabricated line at Biofabricate 2016.

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Living organisms are put to work to create the sustainable mushroom furniture in radically innovative processes. Ecovative and bioMASON’s furniture is grown – with mushrooms, microorganisms, and agricultural waste – and consumes far less energy than traditional furniture manufacturing. The pieces draw on Ecovative’s use of mycelium for the legs, and on bioMASON’s biocement, grown with a little help from bacteria, for the marble-like tabletops on the duo’s Tafl Table and King’s Table. The resulting furniture is toxin-free.

Related: IKEA eyes mushroom packaging to replace nasty polystyrene

Ecovative CEO Eben Bayer said in a statement, “With the launch of Ecovative’s new furniture line and the addition of this collaborative table, we have shifted the conversation from ‘what if’ to ‘where can I buy?’ biofabricated products for the home and office. Having produced more than a million pounds of biofabricated furniture and packaging this year alone, it is clear consumers and business customers are driving demand for these well-designed and earth-friendly products.”

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While Ecovative and bioMASON have shown biofabricated furniture is possible and pretty, they’re working to slash costs with affordability in mind. bioMASON CEO Ginger Krieg Dosier said they aim to reach that goal by modifying the manufacturing process and working with local factories. Both companies believe biofabricated goods are the future; Dosier said as more people experience the products, demand will rise and propel further innovation in the field of biofabrication.

You can buy the mushroom furniture here. A short Tafl Table costs $299 and $399 pays for a tall one. The King’s Table costs $699. Ecovative also offers other biofabricated stools, tables, and accessories on their site.

+ Ecovative

+ bioMASON

Via Popular Science

Images via Ecovative Design (1,2)