Kristine Lofgren

Garlic May Be the Key to Reducing Cow Methane Emissions

by , 06/19/14

methane emissions, garlic emissions, garlic stops methane emissions, garlic methane emissions, garlic stops cow farts, garlic supplement gas, methane global warming, methane climate change, methane global emissions, methane emissions, carbon emissions, climate change, global warming, cows global warming, cows climate change

Sometimes it’s the little things that make all the difference. For instance, in the battle between methane and global warming, garlic could prove to be the little allium that could. Methane is worse for the environment than carbon dioxide, and cows are one of the biggest methane producers on the planet. Since the number of cows on the planet isn’t dropping anytime soon, we need a way to stop the flatulence – and scientists think that feeding cows garlic could be just the trick.

methane emissions, garlic emissions, garlic stops methane emissions, garlic methane emissions, garlic stops cow farts, garlic supplement gas, methane global warming, methane climate change, methane global emissions, methane emissions, carbon emissions, climate change, global warming, cows global warming, cows climate change

Methane accounts for 18% of greenhouse gases and pound for pound, it is more potent than CO2. As cows eats greens, microbes in their stomachs produces methane which must then be expelled. So if we could somehow adjust the microbe population to get it product less methane, it is possible to reduce methane emissions across the globe. So scientists got to work finding something that could alter the methane-producing microbes, and they discovered that there is a compound in garlic that acts like a poison to the microbe populations.

Related: New Feed Supplement Reduces Burping Cows’ Methane Production by 60 Percent

Scientists tested a garlic extract mixed together with cattle feed and found that emissions were reduced by 40%. Researchers believe that a commercial version of the garlic feed could be available within three years, though the current version tends to taint the flavor of the milk, so they are looking into different ways to get the garlic in without altering the flavor. Scientists are also considering how to breed cattle that produces less methane.

Via Upworthy

Lead image via Shutterstock, image via Lily

Related Posts

LEAVE A COMMENT

or your inhabitat account below

Let's make sure you're a real person:


  • Read Inhabitat

  • Search Categories

  • Recent Posts

  • Recent Comments

  • Browse by Keyword

get the free Inhabitat newsletter

Submit this form
popular today
all time
most commented
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
more popular stories >
Federated Media Publishing - Home