Emily Pilloton

Geotectura's AIRchitecture: Flying Buildings!

by , 03/25/09

AIRchitecture, Geotectura, Flying Buildings, Architectural conjecture, Joseph Cory, Futuristic Architecture, Flying Buildings, Flying Architecture, Delft University, Archi-blimps, Architectural blimps

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s… a building? The latest from Geotectura and Malka Architects is a concept for Delft University’s Architecture Faculty- a flying structure called AIRchitecture that’s already making our heads spin. The campus building concepts combines a static learning center for libraries, offices, lecture halls, and an auditorium, with flying workspaces and off-site “zeppelins” to allow for more dynamic collaboration and exchange. This concept might sound crazy, but it is certainly a great example of a minimal footprint.

AIRchitecture, Geotectura, Flying Buildings, Architectural conjecture, Joseph Cory, Futuristic Architecture, Flying Buildings, Flying Architecture, Delft University, Archi-blimps, Architectural blimps

The studio spaces will be split between an off-site “floating building” with “plug-and-play” flying classrooms for minimal environmental impact, along with satellite “zeppelins” in locations around the world. The complex is to operate as an educational machine, providing the structure to support multiple programs, and a dynamic, kinetic architecture that inspires awareness and innovation for young environmental designers, “Learning through motion and arising the activist part of the student,” as described by Geotectura.

AIRchitecture, Geotectura, Flying Buildings, Architectural conjecture, Joseph Cory, Futuristic Architecture, Flying Buildings, Flying Architecture, Delft University, Archi-blimps, Architectural blimps

If you’re wondering about the mechanics of this UFO-type building, the structure of the zeppelin will be built from carbon and aluminum, outfitted with PV cells embedded within the skin of a balloon frame. The designers describe the experience as “More than a building – a way of life,” that will encourage architecture students to question everything.

+ Geotectura

AIRchitecture, Geotectura, Flying Buildings, Architectural conjecture, Joseph Cory, Futuristic Architecture, Flying Buildings, Flying Architecture, Delft University, Archi-blimps, Architectural blimpsWe don’t know why this flying building would be hanging out over Luxor Casino in Las Vegas, but we LOVE this crazy image!

AIRchitecture, Geotectura, Flying Buildings, Architectural conjecture, Joseph Cory, Futuristic Architecture, Flying Buildings, Flying Architecture, Delft University, Archi-blimps, Architectural blimps

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7 Comments

  1. jrcasser April 12, 2011 at 11:10 pm

    don’t propose something if you cant make it work.

  2. layaaaff May 30, 2009 at 8:55 pm

    ok, so if you thought this project is funny, you should visit geotectura’s website at http://www.geotectura.com, some really wacky crazy idea’s that frankly astound me. how would any of it work?!

  3. layaaaff May 30, 2009 at 8:36 pm

    this is a joke. if i was to present this at my current university as a project in third year of architecture, it would be torn apart. how on earth is it low environmental impact? or even feesable?! how to basic amenities work like water supply, toilets etc?? look at the angles, its by no means aerodynamic… or aesthetic! how many hours would it take to get to vagas as suggested!?! seems like a totally unthought out concept to me. is this actually a first year project?! if so, a commendable effort. if not…

  4. joe lee April 6, 2009 at 11:24 am

    it is so funny, make it fly!

  5. joe lee April 6, 2009 at 11:19 am

    it is so interesting and funny! make it fly !

    it is wonderful!

  6. architettomaschietto March 29, 2009 at 8:16 am

    go on, make them fly higher

  7. angie717 March 26, 2009 at 1:55 pm

    I know it’s still in it’s concept phase, but how will this thing fly? I also don’t see why the balloon part (i’m not sure what it’s supposed to be called) is boxy like that, how does it benefit the structure? I’d like to fly on something like this, if it someday actually works, but I’m sure it would be extremely costly. Looks like a great way to learn and travel.

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