The ghostly ruins of a 16th-century church have emerged from the depths of a reservoir in Mexico. Abandoned around the late 1700s, the church, known as the Temple of Quechula, was flooded by a dam in 1966. However, the recent drought plaguing the southern Mexican state of Chiapas has dropped water levels so severely that the magnificent temple has risen out from the waters.


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The Temple of Quechula, also known as the Temple of Santiago, is believed to have been built by a group of monks led by Friar Bartolome de la Casas. Despite the church’s impressive size—it measures 183 feet in length and 42 feet in width with walls rising to around 30 feet—the church was abandoned due to the big plagues of the late 18th century. The church ruins were finally lost to the waters when the government flooded the area in 1966 to form the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir.

Related: Ancient Underwater City Flooded by the Chinese Government Becomes Major Tourist Attraction

However, this year’s drought dropped the reservoir’s water levels by 25 meters (82 feet), thus exposing a large portion of the church. This isn’t the first time the temple ruins have resurfaced; water levels dropped so low in 2002 that visitors could even walk inside the building. Now that the church has reappeared, fishermen have begun ferrying curious tourists to and from the ruins.

Via The Telegraph

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Screenshot via The Telegraph video