Teiknistofan Tröð, Geirsnef peninsula, bicycle bridge, pedestrian bridge, land art, Elliðaár’s estuary, Elliðaár, Iceland, Reykjavík, LEDs, pyramidal bridge, Bridges by Teiknistofan Tröð

Split into two nearly equal-length sections, the bridges span two waterways at the river fork. Rising like a piece of land art, the vermillion red support structure is constructed out of steel columns that form the shape of a tilted pyramid. The two pyramids appear as mirror copies of one another that change shape depending on the viewing angle. Steel tension rods stabilize the 36-meter-long hollow concrete decks.

Teiknistofan Tröð, Geirsnef peninsula, bicycle bridge, pedestrian bridge, land art, Elliðaár’s estuary, Elliðaár, Iceland, Reykjavík, LEDs, pyramidal bridge, Bridges by Teiknistofan Tröð

Related: Bicycle Snake Bridge Makes Urban Cycling Even Safer in Copenhagen

“The goal was to minimise the use of material by giving the bridges a basic shape that also becomes their identity,” the architects said in a statement. “The stable basic structural systems allowed material usage and construction cost to be minimised.” The pedestrian and cycling bridges were completed in 2013 as part of a plan to emphasize sustainable transport in Iceland and visually bridge the industrial history of the Geirsnef peninsula with Elliðaár’s estuary landscape.

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