Diane Pham

GIVEAWAY: Win a Self-Watering TriPot (Worth $50!)

by , 10/21/10

giveaways, free stuff, win it, win this, green giveaways, eco friendly planters, green planters, recyclable planters, recyclable plastic, self watering planters, self watering pot, self watering pots, Tripot

If you love plants but often find yourself too inundated by the daily grind to properly care for them, Greenamic‘s TriPot may be just what you need to keep them happy and healthy. Not only does this awesome recyclable pot let plants “take care of themselves” for up to 8-weeks, but they use less H2O than conventional methods for watering. This week we’re giving away one of these amazing, self-watering TriPot planters to one lucky reader, and all you have to do to win is sign up for our newsletter and leave a comment below! So is your thumb turning green at the thought of owning TriPot? Enter to win today!

TO ENTER THIS GIVEAWAY:

1. SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER HERE > (If you are not already a subscriber). We’ll be announcing the winners in our weekly newsletter, so if you want to find out who won, you’ll need to receive it in order to claim your prize!

2. LEAVE A COMMENT BELOW and tell us about your most successful or unsuccessful gardening attempt. The deadline for this fabulous giveaway is November 9th. We’ll pick the comment we like best and announce the winner in our newsletter in two weeks, so make sure you’re signed up!

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93 Comments

  1. Hue le Thi June 11, 2013 at 3:10 pm

    Your product is great. This product literally green with consumers because it helps us to save a lot: save water, save time, save energy to pump water. We can grow fresh vegetables at home without fear of wasting.
    It\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\’s great.
    We have a vase products with recycled plastic bottles used. We also save as your product, but it is not automatic watering irrigation ways that we have three days.

  2. Michelle Becker-Bernas December 27, 2012 at 8:50 pm

    I don’t have a front yard, I have a front YARDEN! I successfully converted a boring rectangle of weedy grass to a beautiful and neighborhood inspiring YARDEN! The best part, most items in it were obtained free on craigslist or were clippings from friends gardens.

  3. greentone enviro design December 14, 2012 at 11:22 am

    What a unique container that would house my indoor herb garden. I love it!!

  4. jcchouinard December 6, 2012 at 4:07 pm

    A haouse should always be filled with plant in order to breathe well. I want those plant to be as self-sufficient as possible. This invention is a brilliant idea

  5. North Face Summit Series December 3, 2012 at 8:13 am

    I won’t be able to see him today.Hold on.All for one,one for all.Old tunes are sweetest and old friends are surest.You should look at it yourself.Am I allowed to stay out past 10?All my best memories come back clearly to me, some can even make me cry.Someone is ringing the bell.The figure seems all Right.Had it not been for the alarm clock she wouldn’t have been late.
    North Face Summit Series http://northfacesummitseries.yolasite.com/

  6. otunt200 otunt200 October 6, 2011 at 6:43 pm

    My most successful gardening project was when i planted the guacomole seed into my mom’s flower bed. Although there is no fruit yet, it takes up to 10 years, it is already a few feet high and branchy looking tree.

  7. kiwikev September 29, 2011 at 4:48 pm

    Didn’t even know these existed. How cool. Great way to encourage more people to have plants in the house, especially those that are not very reliable at feeding them. :P

  8. farshad_aban June 21, 2011 at 1:37 am

    I live in middle easet with hot summers. I think it can be a good and logical solution to grow some sensitive plants.

  9. mralextran23 November 13, 2010 at 10:33 pm

    my mom has soo many plants in the house that i’d believe our water bill is sky high so if i win this item it would save for money & the environment. PLEASE PICK ME! :D

  10. rzollin November 10, 2010 at 11:24 am

    I used to live in an old brownstone in Boston’s South End. My apartment was half underground and the only windows I had looked out to a concrete stoop/ the sidewalk. One summer I decided to start a container garden full of morning glories. I strung clear lines from the bars on my windows to the containers and the wrought iron fence. It created a beautiful light/ privacy filter for my apartment all summer long. :o )

  11. greenlady222 November 8, 2010 at 2:04 pm

    I can use all the help available….PLEASE!!!

  12. kathleens November 8, 2010 at 11:18 am

    The most successful is a recent time and I\\\’ve been gardening for over 20 years. We recently moved to a property on a river. Instead of using our house water at the tap, I collect a bucket of river water to take care of my house plants. There is no need to add any kind of food to the water any longer. The plants just thrive with the river water!!!

  13. jordan4444 November 7, 2010 at 7:57 pm

    College dorm rooms suck. The concrete walls are painted white, my bunk bed is sixteen inches away from the ceiling (similar to sleeping conditions in Jewish concentration camps during WWII), and the carpet is a lovely barf-stained gray. In an effort to make the room more vibrant, I planted a cute little jade plant in a ceramic pot I decorated in the second grade. I named the jade Sunny, I am happy now. :)

  14. Lilee November 7, 2010 at 3:21 pm

    I live in the desert soutwest….
    killed a cactus on my patio by OVER watering :)

  15. Nan November 7, 2010 at 3:14 pm

    too much love (water) is my failing. Some like, others don\\\’t and the floor/furniture bear the swollen marks of my good intentions. I welcome this easy way to offer my dear ones water as they require it AND no marks on the table.

  16. cheryllion November 7, 2010 at 2:34 pm

    I love fresh herbs in the kitchen, especially rosemary, so I’m always buying those little two-dollar pots in the grocery stores. I’ll use them quickly in a recipe — and I’d better, because within the week they are dry and dead. Even if I thought I remembered to water them (and I’m sure I didn’t). I’ve spent hundreds and hundreds of dollars on those 2-dollar pots. Maybe if I win this I could get one big rosemary plant for my kitchen, and actually keep it alive! I’ll even send weekly updates on my progress ;)

  17. softie100 November 7, 2010 at 1:57 pm

    My favorite was planting along the riverbanks, everything came out so well and hearty, softie100@hotmail.com

  18. danorzzz November 7, 2010 at 12:12 pm

    Just hit the first anniversary of owning my first home! We attempted to garden and fix up the backyard, but mid summer I realized it was all for not as the large tree in my backyard showered the ground with little berries. I came to find out it was a mulberry tree, which at first I thought was cool but later discovered that rotting berries attract flies and truly doesn’t smell all that wonderful once baked in the summer sun. Thus my backyard was avoided and my gardening endeavors failed as a result. Anyone have any suggestions or experience in dealing with a mulberry tree?

  19. dandersn2000 November 7, 2010 at 11:23 am

    My most successful gardening event was teaching my kids how to grow vegetables from seed to crop. Peas worked best. They also like to eat salad now!

  20. flutterzby November 7, 2010 at 3:14 am

    Overwatering is always an issue since moving from a hot, dry climate to a temperate rainforest which is cool and moist all the time so these pots look like a splendid solution.

  21. ajosh November 6, 2010 at 4:42 pm

    I love plants, and especially try to buy unique ones whenever I can find something interesting and new that I don\\\’t already have. Instead of the crazy cat lady, I may be the crazy plant lady in the neighborhood, but in this case, it’s a good thing. :-) I have pretty good luck with my outdoor plants, and recently feel lucky that three of my indoor orchids are continuing to thrive.

  22. slotowngirl November 6, 2010 at 1:43 pm

    My boyfriend and I moved into a new place together last winter. At our housewarming party everyone brought us the cutest little potted plants. 10 months later, every plant is on the brink of disaster and we’ve had to ration them out to green-thumbed friends for recovery… kinda like sending your kids to boarding school. :-( we hope they will come back to us grown, healthy, and with an instruction booklet on how to raise them!

  23. Sprout5 November 6, 2010 at 1:14 pm

    I am a busy working mom of 2 young kids but I am blessed with a large, south-facing balcony in NYC. My greatest success with gardening is that in spring, my kids helped to plant lots of herbs and vegetable seeds in various sized pots and this summer and fall we enjoyed homemade salsa from the tomatoes, cilantro, peppers and scallions all grown on our balcony as well as lots of pesto from the many basil plants we have and fresh green beans that the kids eat right off the plant! The kids really love our balcony garden and harvesting our own veggies and herbs – they get very excited when they see ripe green beans, peppers and tomatoes and surprised to pull up \\\”real carrots\\\” out of the dirt!

  24. debby14 November 6, 2010 at 11:09 am

    This would make up for those “senior moments” when I bypass a certain houseplant in my rounds until I suddenly notice it’s turning brown and wilting.

  25. abthere2 November 6, 2010 at 8:22 am

    Over the past 11 years watching the tiny white pine seedling that my daughter brought home from kindergarten on Earth Day grow into a real honest to goodness tree. It’s like a little miracle and we frequently comment on how we can’t believe it actually ‘worked’ (putting something so little in the ground, giving it so little thought and effort, and getting such an incredible return.)

  26. scantando November 5, 2010 at 3:28 pm

    At home I have assumed the role of gardener for my parents since they always forget to water the plants. My mom has a planter in the backyard next to our garage and each year we buy lots of flowers in an attempt to fill it up. The flowers never seem to fill in enough space or grow as well as we would have hoped. She always wanted a wild flower look, rather than the normal marigolds or pansies. So this past mother\\\\\\\’s day I came back from school and went to home depot the night before. I bought as many big \\\\\\\”wild\\\\\\\” looking flowers as I could and hid them in my car. The next morning I got up extra early and planted them all. I gave her a card that read \\\\\\\”You always do things for me so I wanted to do something for you. Look in the backyard and see what I did\\\\\\\”. Needless to say as soon as she saw the planter she started crying and hugged me a lot. From that point on both of my parents were determined to take better care of the plants while I was at school. Throughout the summer they began planting more and more and the backyard looked great. I hope their new passion for keeping the garden growing continues into next year.

  27. kdabbler November 5, 2010 at 1:49 pm

    My gardening success seems so random. Some plants thrive under my attention, others die from my kindness. My greatest success this summer was raising corn from containers!

  28. Disha J Kuzhively November 5, 2010 at 12:28 pm

    i study in a residential school. We stay in dormitories. the window near my cot has two door, a mesh door in the inside and a glass door in the outside. I always keep the window open to let in fresh air. The idea of growing climbers at the window sill struck me. I took a bottle filled three fourth with water and started growing Silver Vine. Now my window is the most beautiful and the most green. Sometimes ladybugs do visit my cot due to the silver vine.

  29. pinochle November 5, 2010 at 12:05 pm

    Win?

  30. ewysiwyg November 5, 2010 at 11:34 am

    I have never let a plant go un-killed. Try though I might, I have left only death and destruction in my wake. I even killed a silk plant. True Story: My very first apartment, and I tried to decorate a little. I didn’t have much money,but my apartment complex had huge basement full of unused lobby decorations from the past that we were allowed to select from. I took home a nice coffee table, a chair that only had sun damage on the back, and could easily be hidden with a nice throw blanket, and a tall silk palm-style plant. I arranged my new little bungalow as best I could, and went back to job hunting and hoping I wouldn’t run out of money. As distracted as I was, I didn’t notice that I was giving it WAY too much sun off in it’s corner, and I was too young to know these things need to be dusted, and maintained. I didn’t so much as glance at it for months, but when next I bothered, I am afraid it had turned completely yellow, the leaves had curled up, and the entire thing was covered in a mass of spiderwebs and dust. I looked exactly like a tree that had been unwatered, and allowed to get mites. It was awful.

    That was my last plant. With the knowledge that I could even kill silk plants, I have been too gun shy to attempt to ever maintain a living thing in my home that doesn’t bark or whine to let me know it needs attention.

  31. GIVEAWAY: Win This Self... November 5, 2010 at 11:16 am

    [...] easily grow some greens in your home this winter? Then look no further, because this spectacular TriPot may be just what you need to bring some life back to your barren home. This week we’re giving [...]

  32. catiamrf November 4, 2010 at 7:39 pm

    I have a lovely (and nuts) cat called Margarida that loves to eat the juicy leaves of my plants. So, the real challenge for me is to keep the cat away from my plants now that they don´t have the risk of getting dry with something like this Tripot… ;)

  33. BOJENSEN November 4, 2010 at 5:00 pm

    I tried to grow just cactus and only have dirt but it was too difficult so now I have my yard filled with ground cover and cactus so I succeeded in a different way!

  34. dentdelion November 2, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    Four years back, I bought a discounted,sick orchid and nursed it back to health. This year, my beautiful orchid flowered for us. I think this self-watering pot will be perfect for my orchid.

  35. Tackall88 November 1, 2010 at 2:07 pm

    this is so neat, my plants always dies with no enough water

  36. rebel24 October 29, 2010 at 6:21 pm

    I bought a Fuschia off of a market stall, it was half dead when I bought it. it continued to get worse for a month when it shrivelled up and looked dead, I then put it in the greenhouse in a vain hope that it would live again. I checked after christmas and it had grown again and in the summer it grew the largest flowers I have seen on a fuschia, they are stunning.

  37. shellthebell October 29, 2010 at 4:12 pm

    I really wanted to have a container garden for the tiny deck on the back of my apartment. I bought regional plants so they would survive without daily watering and grow back next year.
    They were outside all summer and never really bloomed. I’d occasionally get a coveted purple blossom, but overall, just greenery.
    To help the plants survive the winter I brought them out of the frost and into my workplace. Now, every stem beautiful tiny purple flowers.

  38. meelg October 29, 2010 at 6:36 am

    While I was in the army (armored corps) I was feeling pretty down about being in a dry, lifeless desert. So during my free time, I looked up how to keep plants green while using very little water, and that’s how i discovered terrariums. I needed to make one that would be very mobile and as durable as can be when you’re talking about a mini garden encased in a small glass case.

    I discovered that I could make my terrarium in a lightbulb! So I looked around day while patrol and saw a discarded incandescent bulb and hollowed it out according to instructions I found on YouTube. My buddy was transfered for a week from a base further north and I asked him to scrape up some moss for me.

    I ground up some sandstone and charcoal, put it on the bottom of the bulb to give it a well-ventilated base, put in the moss carefully in bits and pieces using some wire that I bent into the shape of tweezers, and finished it off with a little piece of cactus that i broke off.

    I then used the same bit of wire as a stand for the bulb, and now my terrarium is here on my computer desk back home, still with the same moss and cactus!

  39. bythece October 28, 2010 at 7:05 pm

    I moved from WI to FL about 20 years ago. I miss my daughters and family up there. To take the edge off and provide a challenge, my daughter, who has beautiful hanging plants etc during the WI summer, pulls all of them up by the roots, no dirt, and UPS’s them to me in FL. After a couple of months of babying them, they provide my friends and FL family with awesome blooms. Some have lived for many years! I think they’re happy to have escaped the freeze!!

  40. greensthings October 28, 2010 at 6:24 pm

    I have had some great gardens in the past and always thought of myself as having a green thumb. I moved into a new place last winter and it had never had a garden, So this spring, I stripped off grass in rows (I was going to try strip gardening, so conserve water, nutrients etc), then I started to roto till and I started to hit rocks..lots of rocks…BIG rocks! I went to the County Ag office and discovered that where I was digging my garden used to be a stream that was redirected, as well as we are in the Glacial Moraine area!! I pulled enough rocks out of 6 20ft long rows that each were only 2 feet wide to have a pile 8 feet in diameter and 4 foot high! The largest rock pulled out was over 75 pounds!!!
    Every time I go out to hoe and weed, I find more rocks that have moved up through the soil. I harvested more rocks than any vegetable I planted! I know over the winter more rocks will migrate up, so next spring I will be pulling rocks again….

  41. JCrossDesign October 28, 2010 at 6:15 pm

    On my 7th birthday, my dad brought home a beautiful African Violet for me. It had purple flower with white, ruffly edges. He probably expected it not to live more then a month or two. A few months went by and the plant was still alive….then years went by. The delicate African Violet had produced may other African Violets and was still growing. When the plant was about 10 years old, sadly, it got a disease called \”root rot\”. I was able to nurse it through and it is now back to health. It is 11 years old and counting. My African Violet that I got for my 7th birthday has produced at least 10 other plants.

  42. projectmanager October 28, 2010 at 4:46 pm

    Now that the kids are having kids, we often take road trips for long weekend to see the growing family to the neglect of our plants at home – this would be a great help to keep \\\’em green while we are on the road!

  43. Brett October 28, 2010 at 1:44 pm

    Well, let me start off by saying that growing new plants/seedlings in my office is challanging. I have a window in my office that shines light most of the day and a air vent nearby. Therefor when I either leave for the weekend or have to go out in the field, my plants and their soils are dry as a bone when I return. I need a gardener in my office when I am away!!!

  44. speshalkay October 27, 2010 at 4:58 am

    I successfully planted up a shoe store hanger (for the back of a door) with lettuce, and had leaves all summer long! I also successfully have grown an avocado tree in my bedroom. It does leaves very well, although there are never any fruit, and it has managed to get 9feet high! On the flip side, all my bean seedlings got eaten, as did the cat nip, but by different species. Cat nip now grows in a cage for it’s own safety :-)

  45. broad October 26, 2010 at 8:04 pm

    i only garden veggies–flowers freak me out. but my friend sent a poinsettia for my father\’s wake and it\’s thrived so much I just split it into three pots!

  46. Ringwraith6 October 25, 2010 at 11:57 pm

    When I went to my grandma’s place for the summer (and holidays), everything was green, green, green. In the middle of the mountains, it was just generally green anyway, but she (and her mother and mother’s mother, etc) had big gardens outside and plants all over the place inside. She had glass shelves in all the windows brimming with African violets. I, however, am the grim reaper of the plant world. Oh…the carnage that has been my attempts to grow anything but my own hair! Thankfully, plants can’t organize into posses and hunt down the 10 most wanted perpetrators of atrocities against peace loving plants, because I’d be at the top of the list. Uhhh…they *can’t*, right? I *love* plants and if there is something that can help me grow something successfully I’d be very greatful for the opportunity to try it. I’ve wasted so much money over the years with my failed attempts, I can’t afford to spend anything more. Help?

  47. okphoenix October 25, 2010 at 4:09 pm

    Being a native of Phoenix, Arizona, the sweltering desert heat is no friend to a lush vegetable garden. My father and I decided to build a fully hydroponic greenhouse in our backyard. The plan work miraculously for a couple of years. We were growing tomatoes as big as my fists and cucumbers as long as my arms. Alas, we underestimated the all powerful desert sun, and the PVC pipe framework turned out to be a bad idea. Within two years the greenhouse had crumbled, leaving us with an unfulfilled taste for homegrown vegetables. Back to the old drawing board.

    -Travis

  48. richak21 October 25, 2010 at 3:03 pm

    My mom has this very odd plant and we have no idea what it is called much less how to describe it so we can google it. Well I have been trying to start a ‘baby’ from it and on attempt three I believe I have been successful!

  49. wolfadvocate@gmail.com October 25, 2010 at 1:41 pm

    I love this pot~ Thank you very much for the chance to win. I’m already a newsletter member and have been foreva!! inhabitat rox

  50. cas11smile October 25, 2010 at 6:34 am

    I use to have 2 great plants (basil and rosemary), and they were stolen off of my front porch after a whole summer of cultivation! Now I need to grow indoors for the winter and have no pots, these self watering plants are great! Especially for a student, like me who doesn’t spend a lot of time at home!

  51. BeholdersEye October 25, 2010 at 3:03 am

    I had ten house plants, they are all dead, damn watering can had a hole in it, that is my story and I’m sticking to it. Already on the mailing list.

  52. kellyrobin October 24, 2010 at 10:19 pm

    As a transplant from a fairly rural area to apartment living right outside of a major city, I was stumped my first summer as to how to get the great veggies I used to be able to grow in my yard. The past two summers, however, I have managed some incredible container veggies on my tiny balcony. Even now, a few days from November in the mid-Atlantic, I am still getting tomatoes off my plants. That certainly wouldn’t have been possible in my gardens of days gone by.

  53. Tsubugs October 24, 2010 at 10:01 pm

    I\’ve always been a spring person. During the spring, I just feel much more alive and happy than I do in other months. I think that for me, having living things growing around me makes me feel good. When I see dead plants, it makes me sad and tired and when I see living ones, it makes me feel a little more energetic and alive. It\’s almost like I feel something growing and happy inside living plants that makes me feel happy when I\’m near them.

    This past spring I was feeling extremely down. After a series of life crisis, I had pretty much lost hope. For some reason, I randomly got the idea that I wanted to start gardening in my windowsill. I decided that when I got my first apartment, I would garden a lot as a hobby. I\’d never tired very hard to grow anything, but I felt like I needed a positive hobby to help cheer me up.

    After a few weeks, I decided that I wanted to try gardening so badly that I would try a few planters and see how I did with them in my room at home. I went down to the local hardware store and picked up my first gardening supplies.

    At first, I had no luck getting my seeds to grow. I went back a few weeks later for advice, and found out that I was watering the plants too little. As soon as I started watering them more, they started to sprout. I was so excited to see my sprouts that I went around telling just about everyone.

    Every night during the spring and much of the summer, I would water my plants often, gaze at them happily as they grew in my windowsill and even breath on them for extra nourishment every night before bed. Seeing the plants grow and knowing that I was doing something so fun and positive really did help my health. Somehow, also having something living in my room made my room feel less sad and stressful.

    Over the past spring, summer and early fall I grew plants in my little garden. As it turns out, I have a rather green thumb. My sweet peas and wildflowers grew the most. My columbines and hollyhocks are growing quite large now.

    I\’ve learned that growing things is something I do enjoy. Having little living things around me for me to take care of was one stepping stone on which I started to pull out of my gloominess. I think that as a person, having other things that need taking care of helps me stop focusing on my problems so much. When I look at my little plants, I can see that even when I was feeling my worst I was able to make some little thing feel better, or grow something positive in the world. At times, that makes me remember that I have a good future ahead of me too.

    When I do finally get myself more together, I want my apartment to be filled with plants. I have a plan of growing my own herbs and, someday in the next few years I want to start an organic garden where I\’ll grow vegetables to give to local homeless shelters.

    I\’ve thought that for me personally, giving something really does help me forget my own negative thoughts about myself. however, just giving money doesn\’t do that for me. It helps me to be able to constantly see the thing I\’m doing in progress for someone else and spend my own energy on it. I think that over time, gardening may very well continue to be a source of positivity and growth for myself as well as my plants.

  54. Johne October 24, 2010 at 9:46 pm

    Most of my gardening attempts end in disaster because I travel so much. Self water is right up my alley!

  55. matthewrd October 24, 2010 at 8:52 pm

    This summer I planted a tomato plant. It’s huge well over 6 feet tall. Now send me the pots!

  56. Tsubugs October 24, 2010 at 7:04 pm

    I’ve always been a spring person. During the spring, I just feel much more alive and happy than I do in other months. I think that for me, having living things growing around me makes me feel good. When I see dead plants, it makes me sad and tired and when I see living ones, it makes me feel a little more energetic and alive. It’s almost like I feel something growing and happy inside living plants that makes me feel happy when I’m near them.

    This past spring I was feeling extremely down. After a series of life crisis, I had pretty much lost hope. For some reason, I randomly got the idea that I wanted to start gardening in my windowsill. I decided that when I got my first apartment, I would garden a lot as a hobby. I’d never tired very hard to grow anything, but I felt like I needed a positive hobby to help cheer me up.

    After a few weeks, I decided that I wanted to try gardening so badly that I would try a few planters and see how I did with them in my room at home. I went down to the local hardware store and picked up my first gardening supplies.

    At first, I had no luck getting my seeds to grow. I went back a few weeks later for advice, and found out that I was watering the plants too little. As soon as I started watering them more, they started to sprout. I was so excited to see my sprouts that I went around telling just about everyone.

    Every night during the spring and much of the summer, I would water my plants often, gaze at them happily as they grew in my windowsill and even breath on them for extra nourishment every night before bed. Seeing the plants grow and knowing that I was doing something so fun and positive really did help my health. Somehow, also having something living in my room made my room feel less sad and stressful.

    Over the past spring, summer and early fall I grew plants in my little garden. As it turns out, I have a rather green thumb. My sweet peas and wildflowers grew the most. My columbines and hollyhocks are growing quite large now.

    I’ve learned that growing things is something I do enjoy. Having little living things around me for me to take care of was one stepping stone on which I started to pull out of my gloominess. I think that as a person, having other things that need taking care of helps me stop focusing on my problems so much. When I look at my little plants, I can see that even when I was feeling my worst I was able to make some little thing feel better, or grow something positive in the world. At times, that makes me remember that I have a good future ahead of me too.

    When I do finally get myself more together, I want my apartment to be filled with plants. I have a plan of growing my own herbs and, someday in the next few years I want to start an organic garden where I’ll grow vegetables to give to local homeless shelters.

    I’ve thought that for me personally, giving something really does help me forget my own negative thoughts about myself. however, just giving money doesn’t do that for me. It helps me to be able to constantly see the thing I’m doing in progress for someone else and spend my own energy on it. I think that over time, gardening may very well continue to be a source of positivity and growth for myself as well as my plants.

  57. Ferdinand A. October 24, 2010 at 7:00 pm

    My family rarely goes on vacation together. But the last time it happened, my wife’s potted “five fingers”, a plant said to be a lucky charm almost died. It was given to her as New Year’s present by a friend. Our vacation was originally scheduled for 3 days so we know that the plant can survive until we arrive since we watered it before we leave. But a cancellation on our return flight was not part of the plan. The lucky charm almost ran out of luck. To make sure that it won’t happen again, I fitted it with an old dextrose kit which I used during my last hospitalization. However, my “invention” gave the plant a sick look. It also solicits questions and remarks from neighbors. The Self-Watering TriPot will be the right solution to our problem minus the annoying comments.

  58. eddiematt October 24, 2010 at 6:59 pm

    I made my very own rosemary at home and cooked delicious omelet with it last Sunday for my breakfast!!!

  59. Jeremy C October 24, 2010 at 6:33 pm

    My wife and I live on a sailboat in San Diego, and we don\’t have much space onboard for growing our own food, so we get most of our fresh produce from the local farmers markets. However, we have made a small attempt at growing herbs on the dock next to the boat. The rosemary has done well, but we just can\’t keep the basil or cilantro happy. They seem to need more water than I can remember to give them during the busy work week and being gone on trips with work, sailing, and rock climbing. I would love to have a self-watering pot to be able to keep our herbs bountiful to add delicious flavors to our home-cooked meals.

  60. jrblissproductions October 24, 2010 at 4:20 pm

    I live in Phx,AZ and for some reason my thumb is BLACK. But, on one occasion a few summers ago I was able to grow a cantaloupe. Just one but it was delicious!

  61. marietta October 24, 2010 at 2:45 pm

    I started some years ago with one succulent. I cultivated several out of that one and started to share my offshoots with friends and family. Now everybody owns a low maintenance plant! we also keep swapping plants with each other, and its always really nice to see a relative of my plant coming back to me!

  62. ColdFlame October 24, 2010 at 2:41 pm

    What an innovative product; I have a few plants in hard to reach places (up high on ledges 15′ about floor level) that I have to bring in a ladder to water. This would make life a lot easier! :)

  63. DueBaci October 24, 2010 at 2:29 pm

    My Babci (Polish grandmother) had the most wonderful gardens. In our backyard and a whole lot behind her sisters house. I followed instructions from her but was too young to know why I was doing what I did. She could grow a beautiful tree from a stick. I did not inherit her green thumb. I seem to kill everything that comes in the house. I’d love to try this new pot.

  64. designerPB October 24, 2010 at 2:06 pm

    excited about this addition to the information overload in my inbox. lol. I have some african violets and a money plant that are hanging on for dear life in my dorm room and a self-watering pot would be amazing. I spend so much time in the architecture studio that I’m thankful these plants aren’t dead yet.

  65. madelinehasbeen October 24, 2010 at 2:02 pm

    I don’t have any successful or unsuccessful gardening stories….I’ve been too afraid to attempt anything, sensing my overextended schedule would result in any plant’s death. I would love to have a mini herb garden, though. Maybe a win would help me take the leap!

  66. greenprincess October 24, 2010 at 1:58 pm

    I tried planting pepper and tomato seeds at the beginning of the summer and they only grew about 5 inches tall and stopped growing. So instead of having a garden full of vegetables I had to keep going to the grocery store for produce!

  67. terryjr91 October 24, 2010 at 1:55 pm

    I would love to have one of them. Now if only they could cheaply add twitter to it to tell me when to refill it.

  68. edaysleeper October 23, 2010 at 6:31 pm

    This year I had a “pesty” city living related gardening catastrophe. After moving to a new place in Chicago and nurturing an heirloom tomato through the majority of the summer, my rooftop plant finally started to produce perfect, juicy fruit that I couldn’t wait to eat. My first tomato was just about ripe for picking when it went missing. I found it half-eaten and rotten dropped in another area of my rooftop deck. It turns out that the renegade evil squirrels of my neighborhood had stolen it and proceeded to take every other fresh-for-the-picking or growing tomato from my plant. I attempted to prevent their nighttime thievery by encompassing the plant with a custom-built wire and wood-frame cage. However, the plant revolted in captivity and ended up slowly dying and producing no fruit for the remainder of the season. Needless to say, I’m either moving again or won’t be attempting rooftop tomatoes next year…

  69. dweng88 October 23, 2010 at 4:58 am

    I once knew a girl plant named Doma.
    Her name means \”beautiful\” in Tibetan
    and she looked like a pretty palm tree.
    She was gentle and never complained when
    I miss fed her. For that I loved her more
    than any others. When I had to leave at the end
    of the school year, I knew it was time for us to part.
    It was a long plane ride home and I just couldn\’t take her.
    I left her in the common lounge for that someone who will adopt her. I was not a terrible plant owner but to this day I still miss her terribly.

  70. duhrel October 23, 2010 at 1:49 am

    Awesome, I’d sure like one.

  71. bvanwely October 22, 2010 at 6:09 pm

    Successful: We used to live in the Southern Tier of New York in a house with a lot of south-facing glass. I managed to grow salad stuff and even some tomatoes indoors with no fancy gizmos or gadgetry.

    Unsuccessful: We now live in Baltimore with a rooftop deck. Tried planting in recycled wooden barrels. It was a chore getting the barrels and the soil up to the roof. The plants failed to thrive due to excess sun and wind, and the barrels fell apart after a few years.

  72. dpaul420 October 22, 2010 at 4:43 pm

    My bamboo just died, maybe i need this…

  73. wendydelmo October 22, 2010 at 9:37 am

    Well, let me put it this way: as I longingly look at all types of plants, my husbnad follows behind me softly speaking for the plants: \”Help! Help! Don\’t do it! I wnat to live!\”
    I start off strong, but after about a month, I forget to water. Poor plants.

  74. archi_matt October 22, 2010 at 9:08 am

    set up and planted a veggie garden with heaps of useful veggies. awesome!
    Decided to go the whole hog and by some chooks too for some organic no food-miles eggs. awesome!
    In two days, no veggie patch any more, bar a small parsley and a rogue rosemary bush (apparently they\\\’re not so tasty for chooks. Not so awesome.

    Most interesting lesson – chickens will demolish Italian parsley, but steer clear of the tight wavey-leaf kind. Picky!

  75. ChristianAce October 22, 2010 at 3:28 am

    I spent the entire summer preparing a plot of land for gardening, hand dug and tilled it for a few weeks mixing in organic compost and making it fertile again and in early september planted my garden of the usual cucumbers, carrots, peppers, tomato, okra, eggplant, garlic etc . the craziest thing is only one tomato sprouted out of like 30 seeds I planted and it died shortly after. I started getting some bugs and was told marigolds help naturally repel some insects, so I planted to marigolds from pots in the area where the tomatos were supposed to be growing. Mind you this is SMACK DAB in the middle of the fertile garden and the cucumber and peppers and okra and everything is growing like I you wouldn\’t believe… but both the marigold plants died as well after just a few short days. So now I am under the assumption that since I did not win a solar backpack, or a wind charger or anything that maybe that spot is dying so that I can have an air-cleaning self-watering tri-pot…

  76. FrancoB411 October 22, 2010 at 2:18 am

    Worst plant care attempt.. a haiku.

    Worst plant care attempt
    My plant got sad and yellow
    I added water

  77. buckeyebonnie October 22, 2010 at 1:07 am

    I am a beginner and I live in an apartment with a ground floor screened in patio. I started my garden from seeds and every time I watered my plants I made a big mess. I have thought about a water garden. I just think that a self watering pot is the coolest thing I ever saw in all of my new garden adventures. I think maybe if I had the right equipment, I would be able to succeed. But it is so hard to afford the right equipment. I am trying to go all green, but have been having so much trouble getting started. I think if I were to receive this awesome gift, I might be able to start over again. I am about to give up all hope trying to go green in my apartment. But maybe this would help. And it might save me on my water bill too at the same time. I would be so thankful if I were to receive such a generous gift.

  78. ReflectingLight October 22, 2010 at 1:02 am

    Unsuccessful gardening attempt:
    When I was around 7-years-old, my mother had created a mini vegetable garden in our backyard. As I was helping her water the plants, she mentioned how she would sprinkle sugar on the green beans to make them sweet. Although she was referring to sprinkling sugar after picking and cooking the beans, my 7-year-old mind assumed she meant sprinkling sugar as they were growing. Later that day, and with that story in mind, I decided to be a good little helper and sprinkle some sugar on the beans… but as I was standing there, cup of sugar in hand, I thought why not sweeten the other vegetables too (vegetables that taste like candy – every child’s dream, right?). Pleased, I marched back inside and waited. An hour or so later, I went back to the garden to see how the now sweeten vegetables were doing. My eyes grew into saucers when I realized ants (large ones no less!) had overtaken the entire garden. Apparently they had a sweet tooth as well. That was pretty much the end of the garden for that year. Now, over 10 years later, my mother enjoys retelling the tale of my sugary actions, and I’ve learned a bit more about gardening… and of the saying “you can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar,” or in this case, ants with sugar.

  79. metis October 21, 2010 at 11:18 pm

    The local lumberyard often has remaindered or odd lot bits for a good bit less than virgin timber which I’m as excited about keeping out of landfills as getting a deal on re-used building materials, so I picked up what I suspect were originally picnic table parts and playground bits. With a router from the local hackerspace, I built several waist high planters atop my flat garage roof and put a drip irrigation system in it.

    With mostly saved seeds from prior years, I was swimming in cucumbers and beans, have plenty of hot peppers, and am still pulling beets and onions. Dirt from the container grown (old shrub pots) tomatoes next to the planters will go into them, and be appended with worm castings from my kitchen scraps for next year’s crops, and vice versa to keep diseases in check.

    I’m really pleased about getting more shade onto the roof to extend the life of it as well as getting more full sun planting space in my very shady yard.

  80. micaela6955 October 21, 2010 at 7:38 pm

    I already subscribe to the newsletter. I am a much better gardener now, but when I was young and foolish I decided I would have some plants before pets and children. I did everything to keep the ivy plant, spider plant and cactus going…really I did. I talked to them, watered them, and gave them plenty of nutrients in the form of plant food. For awhile, things looked good. They flourished and grew. I was proud of myself and took solace in my new found jungle. But alas, all good things must come to an end. First came the wilting, then the brown leaves, then death. I thought for sure the cactus was going to hang on… I mean, I\\\\\\\’d never heard of anyone killing a cactus. But it was not to be. First the top turned brown, and then it got shriveled, and then, it was no more. I will never know what caused them all to die, but I can tell you I waited a few years before I got a pet… and even longer to have kids!

  81. eseberg October 21, 2010 at 6:52 pm

    This looks cool.

  82. pinkgreenbean October 21, 2010 at 6:23 pm

    My least successful gardening attempt was starting a garden in July in the north, we had just moved and I didn’t know that harvest would be in Sept before it got cold again. Whoops! :)

  83. captunderp October 21, 2010 at 5:10 pm

    keeping plants alive and healthy may have just gotten easier – thanks for the giveaway!

  84. rachel carmen October 21, 2010 at 4:07 pm

    I love how my yard goes from jungle to party space every year because i cannot maintain upkeep. That\’s why this product, like so many great ideas on this site are invaluable to keep some balanced greenery in my world.

  85. tsunam October 21, 2010 at 3:42 pm

    I’d probably have to say the most successful was convincing other people in the office to go in with me on a scheme to do an indoor garden in our office building. I’m sitting not more then about 20-30 feet from 2 tomato bush’s who are still producing tomato’s though..of the pea sized variety right now *laughs*, and a chili pepper plant that has 3-4 peppers ready to be picked right now. I’m aiming to see how long we’ll continue to produce from these pots and perhaps add more in the coming year.

  86. whippeteer October 21, 2010 at 3:31 pm

    Epic Gardening Fail: I can’t even keep an air fern alive. The aloe didn’t last long either. But the dogs are alive, so I must be doing something right. Maybe this will help me turn the corner with plants?

  87. dmon88 October 21, 2010 at 2:52 pm

    self watering? thats so cool. my plants always die. would love one of these for a mini orange tree!

  88. sspinale October 21, 2010 at 2:46 pm

    My most successful and unsuccessful gardening attempt was this summer when my boyfriend and I started our first garden. We live in a desert climate and were not sure what would grow successfully. So we decided to grow lettuce. We planted a lot of seeds just in case, and they all grew! We had salads everyday, sometimes twice but we still had so much lettuce that most of it went bitter! The success was that we grew a huge garden of lettuce, the unsuccessful part was that most of it went to waste! Next year will be better! Thanks!

  89. Candice1984 October 21, 2010 at 2:45 pm

    I was going on a month-long vacation a few years ago, and didn’t have anyone to water our plants. So we filled trays of water beneath the potted plants, then wrapped clear plastic bags around the plants and the trays. When we came back the plants were okay.

  90. dentdelion October 21, 2010 at 2:39 pm

    Build 4 raised beds for our organic, urban garden. Next step, making sun boxes for colder months ahead.

  91. jessirainey October 21, 2010 at 2:38 pm

    Where to start, I have attempted to grow a tomato and herb garden in an area next to my porch. Every year, grasshoppers and butterflies get to eat the crop before I do, but for the most part, I am okay with that. The butterflies are pretty. As for my inside plants, I have a collection of aloes, succulents, and miniature peace lilies. My kitchen window has 4 plants which bring a smile to my face every day.

  92. jovapo October 21, 2010 at 2:29 pm

    I was my aunt, who recently passed away, had a small bodhi tree (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhi_Tree) sapraling she loved. I drove it from Chicago to North Carolina and started nursing it to health. It was doing well for a couple of weeks until one day I came home to find my cat had eaten all the leaves off it. Now there were only 10 or so leaves but it was still upsetting. I stubbornly continued to water it and just this past week 5 new leaves have appeared. I keep it inside and where the cats can’t get to it, but that makes it hard to water. This self watering pot would be perfect for it!

  93. jdp October 21, 2010 at 1:48 pm

    Didn’t even know there WAS a newsletter. Signed up.

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