Lori Zimmer

Global Warming Could Affect Crops Sooner Than We Thought

by , 03/18/14

green design, eco design, sustainable design, global warming, climate change crops, University of Leeds, Nature Climate Change, global crop yields

A new report by scientists at the University of Leeds shows that global warming may affect crops much sooner than originally thought. The study compared data from 1,700 other studies on climate change and agriculture to determine that a global increase of just 2 degrees Celsius could reduce crop yields by as early as 2030.

green design, eco design, sustainable design, global warming, climate change crops, University of Leeds, Nature Climate Change, global crop yields

Published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the study reveals that climate change could affect the world’s crops much earlier than initially anticipated. The scientists found that farmland in temperate and tropical regions would be the most affected, and yields, crop development, and quality would suffer.

The number of studies involving climate change has doubled since 2007, which provided scientists at the University of Leeds with plenty of data to analyze and compare. Before the availability of this comparative data, scientists hypothesized that a slight increase in temperature would not have an adverse affect on the world’s crops. But as more studies have been conducted, consensus has shifted – and the researchers now predict a 25% decline in crop yields by the end of the century. The remainder of the study will be published in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report at the end of March.

Via Phys Org

Images ©Tobyotter and ©smith_cl9

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