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The gorgeous arched conference hall is the first building beyond the reception area that welcomes visitors to the Naman Retreat Resort. A long reflecting pond with a floating stone pathway located in front of the building enhances the hall’s majestic appearance. Topped with an asymmetric pitched roof, the building comprises two parallel spaces: a large closed 13.5-meter-wide hall bookended by large glazed end walls, and a 4-meter-wide loggia to the side.

Related: 15 Conical Bamboo Pillars Hold Up Gorgeous Open Air Cafe in Viet Nam

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The multipurpose hall can accommodate up to 300 people at once and boasts an airy 9.5-meter roof height supported by load-bearing bamboo arches. The two types of bamboo used in construction include the “Luong” bamboo, chosen for its strength and length (it can grow up to 8 meters tall), and used for the straight columns; and the “Tam Vong” bamboo, prized for its flexibility and used to form the arches.

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In addition to the conference hall, the 3.4-hectare Naman Retreat includes 80 bungalows, hotels, 6 VIP villas, and 20 standard villas. The coastal resort is largely built from natural materials, including stone and bamboo, and was created to provide “maximum body and mind purification and relaxation.”

+ Vo Trong Nghia Architects

Images via Vo Trong Nghia Architects, © Hiroyuki Oki