The lighting-caused forest fire blazing through the North Rim of the Grand Canyon doubled in size over the weekend. The Fuller Fire jumped from 5,940 acres to 13,382 on Monday, with zero containment to date.

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Dry and windy conditions on Saturday night helped the blaze spread through treetops near Imperial Point on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon. Currently more than 550 crew members are trying to manage the inferno that began on June 29. Some cloud cover and high humidity has hampered some of the spread since then, yet those in the area are still encouraged to take precautions.

Related: Like Chernobyl all over again: Forest fires release plutonium particles into the air

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The Public Information Officer from the Navajo Nation, Mihio Manus, reached out to nearby residents who may face hazards associated with smoke inhalation. A full list of precautions can be found here, including the importance of following local air quality reports, taking steps to ensure the cleanest air possible indoors, reducing physical exertion, and possibly finding alternative shelter.

Still, the Forest Service notes this is a natural fire with numerous ecological benefits.

“This fire will help restore and protect the beauty and health of this forest for generations to come,” said Chris Marks, National Park Service Deputy Fire Management Officer. “This is an incredibly unique opportunity for visitors to see not only the canyon itself, but fire playing its role on the land.”

Via NBC 12 News, AZ Family

Images via Grand Canyon National Park, Twitter