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The cabin design is based on a simple plan which saves on the circulation space and minimizes complex detailing. This attitude allowed the architects to also minimize maintenance costs and increase material quality. The wooden construction rests on a concrete base and is clad with burnt hardwood paneling using an old Japanese technique to make the wood more durable.

Related: Peter Pichler’s Mirror Houses reflect the amazing beauty of the Dolomites

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A layer of soil and grass covers the house, blending it into the slope-an old Icelandic practice meant to mitigate harsh weather conditions. The interior features a polished concrete floor and walls and ceilings clad in wooden panels referencing the rhythm of the exterior hardwood paneling. The center of the house is dominated by the living room and dining area, with an adjoining kitchen.

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Geothermal hydro-energy warms the house using sources drilled inside the site boundary. These environmentally conscious techniques all contribute to the energy efficiency of the cabin, which has minimal impact on the site and achieves zero carbon footprint.

+ PK Arkitektar

Via Archdaily

Photos by Rafael Pinho