Andrew Michler

Green Tech 'Ghost Town' Hunting For New Home in New Mexico

by , 07/17/12

green city, Center for Testing Evaluation and Innovation, New Mexico ghost town, eco city

Pegasus Holdings just announced that its $1 billion dollar green tech ghost town has been put on hold due to a lack of land. The Center for Testing, Evaluation and Innovation – a city with no inhabitants — is designed to test new green technologies, however the plans are so large that the company has been unable to get enough land to build it. This is bad news for the local community of Hobbs, New Mexico, which was counting on the economic boost the ghost town would provide, but it could be good news for another region as the plans are still being developed and the developer is actively looking for a new site.

green city, Center for Testing Evaluation and Innovation, New Mexico ghost town, eco city,

When we first reported on the plans to build a city that could house 35,000 folks but would only be used to test new technologies, many responded that the idea was a huge waste of resources. The project will allow engineers to push the limits of built environment technologies at scale – smart transportation, grid, energy, and even water technologies. Pegasus explained that the idea was to replicate the real world right down to the light switches and faucets and allows companies to install their new technologies to test without fear of failure leaving users stuck.

But the developer is the one stuck with a plan but no where to put it. The 20-square-mile location west of the small city of Hobbs that they settled on sounded promising, but they haven’t been able to procure enough of the land. There certainly is plenty of raw land out there, and although the reason hasn’t been reported, it seems likely that a land owner or two was holding out. While that site was the developer’s first choice, there are 15 other communities who submitted proposals. While the final site has not been secured, Pegasus is still working on their plans and hopes to keep the monster project in New Mexico, where there are many research facilities and abundant land.

+ Center for Testing, Evaluation and Innovation

Via Daily Mail

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1 Comment

  1. vannshane July 21, 2012 at 3:45 pm

    The stress test of real people using tech would make it the most viable. Anything developed in a test tube usually withers in the real world. Ecosystems do not work in a scientist’s mind of pure relationships. The interconnections are what make ideas reliable and resilient.

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