Nothing warms our design-loving hearts like a project built by and for communities, and with local resources to boot. Working pro bono, Thrive Architecture teamed with nonprofit organization Building Goodness Foundation and local workers to expand an existing Center of Hope Haiti school and orphanage just outside of Hinche. Not only is the project socially meaningful, but environmentally-conscious as well.



Center of Hope Haiti, Thrive Architecture, Building Goodness Foundation, haiti earthquake, buiding in haiti, haiti schools, haiti rebuild, school design, humanitarian design, LED lighting, energy conservation, passive energy, recycled insulation, repurposed styrofoam, locally-sourced materials, green building materials, upcycled building materials

The project, which was completed in October, 2016, included a series of new facilities for an existing school and orphanage run by The Center of Hope Haiti (COHH). As the funding allowed, the construction team was able to build four new buildings to create much-needed space for the educational complex.

Related: Earthquake-resistant orphanage is a welcoming ray of hope in Haiti

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The entire project followed BGF’s construction scheme, which includes using a team of skilled craftsmen and trade professionals along with local unskilled and semi-skilled laborers. The entire group works on the project from start to finish, from site planning and concept design to construction, allowing the communities to create a capable, self-sustaining labor force.

Center of Hope Haiti, Thrive Architecture, Building Goodness Foundation, haiti earthquake, buiding in haiti, haiti schools, haiti rebuild, school design, humanitarian design, LED lighting, energy conservation, passive energy, recycled insulation, repurposed styrofoam, locally-sourced materials, green building materials, upcycled building materials

The layout for the school included a new “sheltering landscape” built on the highest elevation possible in order to offer additional protection during the storm seasons. The team was also careful to protect two existing Mango trees that offer shade from the tropical heat.

Related: Architectural Association School of Architecture bamboo workshops in Haiti teach post-disaster construction techniques

From the beginning of the project, the construction plan consisted of using conventional Haitian construction techniques, including the use of traditional Haitian “parging”, which was left unpainted. Locally-sourced materials made up a good part of the project, including quarried stone that wraps around each of the buildings’ exteriors. Additionally, locally-sourced steel pipes were used as the tie-downs for the roofs, offering solid protection from strong winds. To reduce the school’s energy usage and costs, the buildings mainly depend on natural daylight, but LED lighting is installed throughout the buildings.

All of the buildings were constructed with an extended roof, which double as shade and shelter from the harsh summers. As for the project’s energy conservation strategy, the exterior walls have low operable windows on the courtyard side of the buildings designed to optimize natural air ventilation. For insulation, the walls were built with lightweight Ubuntublox made from repurposed Styrofoam trays that were cleaned, shredded and sewn into rice bags by women in Port-au-Prince.

+ Thrive Architecture

+ Building Goodness Foundation

+ Center of Hope Haiti

Images via Thrive Architecture and Tom Cogill