Etienne Choiniere-Shields

The Cloud Harvester Catches and Stores Fresh Water from Fog

The Cloud Harvester, Etienne Choiniere-Shields, water harvesting, fog, water from fog

The Cloud Harvester is an ingenious device that is designed to catch and condense fog into water droplets which, in turn, run down a stainless steel mesh into a water storage container. The device represents a quantum leap in water collection efficiency, and it’s ideally suited for poor, rural, mountainous, coastal regions with little freshwater resources or infrastructure. It is almost as efficient as existing fog-harvesting devices that are currently on the market, but it is much smaller and more cost-efficient to produce and transport.

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The Cloud Harvester, Etienne Choiniere-Shields, water harvesting, fog, water from fog

A key design challenge was to produce a lighter, longer-lasting product at a considerably lower cost. This was achieved by using light, rustproof aluminium, stainless steel, galvanized steel and tarpaulin; an open extrusion, the lowest tooling-cost method; a simple, straightforward manufacturing process; and a more transportable product.

With a potential output of 1 liter of fresh water per hour for each 10 square feet of mesh/tarpaulin, a $167 Cloud Harvester kit can produce around 45.6 litres per hour under optimum conditions. Even if the actual output was only 10% of this amount, a single net would deliver 5 liters per hour. According to the United Nations, a person needs 20 to 50 litres of water per day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking and cleaning. Given that cloud harvesting clearly can make a significant contribution to water security in many areas of the world at a very low cost, the market for this product definitely exists.

+ Cloud Harvester

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