Gallery: Huawei Unveils Epic Pegasus Sculpture Made From 3,500 Smartpho...

 

Spotted by our friends at Treehugger, this epic Pegasus Sculpture, crafted by London’s Machine Shop from 3,500 Huawei smartphones stands nearly 19 feet tall and boasts a 16 foot wingspan. The mass of Ascend D Quad handsets rest on a frame made from over 650 yards of iron rods, and the whole piece took more than 720 man-hours to craft. Unfortunately, it misses the boat on being a legitimately cool piece of corporate art – read on to learn why.

So where did Huawei’s winged beast fail? As treehugger speculated, the mythical horse appears to be made from 3,500 brand new, otherwise functional handsets. From the company’s video of the Pegasus’s creation, the handsets appear to be fresh out of their packaging, protective film still places over the screens. Here Huawei designed a remarkable, striking marketing campaign, and in doing so exemplified the massive waste problem that is so prevalent in the consumer electronics market.

While we can’t speak directly to the environmental impact of Huawei’s latest devices, smart phones commonly contain lead, mercury and other heavy metals that have a damaging impact on the environment. The most recent data from the United Nations estimates that between 20-50 million tons of toxin-laden e-waste ends up in landfill each year.

Of course, Huawei wants to sell phones – and the 3,500 devices on the Pegasus are the devices they seek to sell. If the plastic film was still covering the screens, it was because they needed the phones to be clean and shiny for the awesome sculpture to wield its full effect. But for a company that claims to be “leading the telecom industry towards an era of ‘green communications‘,” it could be argued that Huawei should have taken the unique creative energy so evident in Pegasus and turned the piece into something that reinforced, rather than contradicted their own environmental message.

The sculpture is presently on display outside the Mobile World Congress in Spain.

+ Huawei

Via Treehugger

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1 Comment

  1. zwerdlds March 1, 2012 at 1:21 am

    Not so! Most companies on refurbing a a genuine device re-apply their protective plastic. I can nearly guarantee that those phones don’t have batteries in them, at the least. Seems to me that just supergluing a bunch of smartphones together wouldn’t be sturdy enough for a statue anyways.

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